SPE logo

Implementation of Drilling Systems Automation

23 – 25 September 2014

Halifax, Nova Scotia, Canada | Four Points by Sheraton Hotel

Schedule Overview

Tuesday, 23 September, 0830–1030

Session 1: Workshop Opening Remarks & Objectives

Welcome & Introduction to the Workshop - This session will give an introduction to drilling automation starting with a review of DSA-TS work.  Introduction to opportunities to improve the drilling process through automation will be discussed along with important definitions of terms and the boundaries of the technical focus. The overall objectives and definition of meeting success and deliverables will also be covered.

Setting Out of Workshop Objectives and Boundaries

  • Fred Florence, National Oilwell Varco
  • Clinton Chapman, Schlumberger

DSATS Business Recap

  • Fred Florence, National Oilwell Varco

DSATS Technical Recap

  • Clinton Chapman, Schlumberger

1100–1230

Session 2: Automation Case Studies

The topic of automating the well construction process has gained a lot of attention and effort in the last few years. Several case histories will be presented discussing the failures as well as the successes from these endeavors. This will help define the status of these efforts to date in bringing automation to the rig floor. The session is an excellent opportunity to discuss the combined experience of the attendees and help define the goals for the workshop technical and business tracks.

A Manufacturer’s Automation Story

  • Tony Pink, National Oilwell Varco

A Service Company’s Story

  • John Macpherson, Baker Hughes

1330–1500

Technical Track Session 3: Drilling Automation Architecture – The Nuts and Bolts

This session is a discussion of the DSA-TS Communications committee work to date.  There will be a review of the objectives of the committee and an overview of the architecture of a proposed solution for drilling automation.  In depth sessions will cover the selection of an interoperability standard (OPC UA) and the modelling of system security to mitigate the possibility of cyber-threats. 

Technical Orientation

  • Pradeep Annaiyappa, Canrig

The Selection of OPC-UA as a Communications Framework

  • Randy Armstrong, Sparhawk Software

Security and Threat Models

  • Catherine Cavazos, National Oilwell Varco

Business Track Session 3: Does Performance Outweigh Cost?

How can we place a value on the benefits of automation?  ROP is easily measured, but what is the value of safety and NPT reduction?  How could this be measured? Are there hidden benefits to implementing automation (e.g. quality control) that we should quantify or is automation an enabler for driving value from other technologies?   

Adaptive Control for Safer Automated Drilling

  • Bill Chmela, Sekal 

1530–1700    

Technical Track Session 4: Advancing the Implementation     

This session is a discussion of how the system architecture introduced in Session 3 can be used to create a drilling automation solution.  The session will describe the Rig Information Model, which is the OPC UA data organization framework used to communicate drilling data and device commands.  This framework will then be applied to the Drill-A-Stand use cases, the series of tasks that occur in drilling a stand of pipe, from slips-out to slips in.

Rig Information Model Introduction – Rig/Equipment

  • Martin Cavanaugh, Cavanaugh Consulting

Business Track Session 4: The Business Model is Broken.  So What?

Many complain that we cannot automate drilling because the business model is broken.  Look at where and why?  How can we pursue business opportunities anyway? The 800 pound Gorilla in the room when automation is discussed is “what is the business model”. So in essence we do not have a model to be broken. The session will address some of the options that are being discussed within the industry. What needs to be done to get a business model flexible enough to address the work flow and liability issues bought about by automation, of the drilling process and drilling equipment, directly and in-directly.                             

Automation in MPD

  • Blaine Dow, M-ISWACO DPM Group       

Wednesday, 24 September, 0830–1000

Technical Track Session 5: Developing a Rig Equipment Information Model (Part I)

As technology progresses, automation capabilities will begin to be built into drilling rig control systems.  In this session, we’ll be validating the current rig information model developed by DSA-TS Comms Team against practical use cases to successfully Drill-A-Stand.  Workgroups will be created including participation from industry experts for particular rig equipment.  Groups will evaluate, discuss, and modify a given information model relative to Drill-a-stand use cases presented in Session 4.  Presentations will be created by the work groups for discussion in Session 6.

Breakout Discussions:

  • Mud Pumps
  • Top Drive
  • Drawworks
  • Autodriller

Business Track Session 5: Big Data? Big Value?

As the industry moves forward to embracing automated drilling equipment and drilling process control, levels of instrumentation and the volumes of data that they produce have the potential to leave engineers struggling on the wrong side of the 80/20 rule. This session will explore how we can manage these rapidly increasing data volumes and leverage them to add real value even with the anticipated increased cost of instrumentation and equipment changeover. Additional barriers to realizing this value will also be explored including interoperability and increased data quality requirements.

Speakers

  • Nathan Zenero, Chesapeake Energy Corp
  • Michael Behounek, Apache
  • Paul Barnes

1030–1200      

Technical Track Session 6: Developing a Rig Equipment Information Model (Part II)        

Each rig equipment information model from Session 5 will be presented to the entire session team.  As a whole, the team will review and provide feedback to ensure the models are complete for the relevant use cases.  We’ll then discuss common patterns across all of the models to ensure similar types of information are interfaced with in a standard manner.

Group Discussions: Review of Objects for Completeness and Pattern Analysis

Business Track Session 6: Big Data, Big Problems?

“Every man for himself” describes the status quo for data management at the rig-site today where every service provider is managing an independent dataset.  Automation requires integration of these datasets into a coordinated data model that meets the needs of all players.  Key to the success of this data model is definition and agreement on the roles and responsibilities governing ownership, licensing and management of the coordinated data.     

Group Discussions: Roles and Responsibilities Governing Ownership, Licensing and Management of Data      

1330–1500

Technical Track Session 7: Exposing, Discovering, and Using Automation Capabilities (Part I)

Automation capabilities must be able to be added to new and existing rigs in order to add value to the overall drilling process.  Patterns for exposing, discovering, and using these tasks are important to consider and discuss to assure they are handled in the architecture for Drilling Automation if it is to be an industry standard in the future.  This includes capabilities exposed by equipment attached to the rig control system, tasks provided by external agents, and their interaction with the driller.

Business Track Session 7: Managing Contractual Specifications

Do today’s contractual relationships impede automation’s adoption? What are the risks: safety, change, environmental issues, economics, labor relations, data delivery standards and more? Are these risks and other concerns covered in today’s contracts?  We look at the contractual arrangements amongst the team delivering the successful well from the perspectives of an operator, a drilling contractor and a third party.

Speakers

  • Blaine Dow, M-ISWACO DPM Group
  • Adham Jaber, Weatherford

1530–1700

Technical Track Session 8: Exposing, Discovering, and Using Automation Capabilities (Part II)

Automation capabilities must be able to be added to new and existing rigs in order to add value to the overall drilling process.  Patterns for exposing, discovering, and using these tasks are important to consider and discuss to assure they are handled in the architecture for Drilling Automation if it is to be an industry standard in the future.  This includes capabilities exposed by equipment attached to the rig control system, tasks provided by external agents, and their interaction with the driller.

Business Track Session 8: Developing a Culture for Automation

During this round table discussion, we will talk about what drilling automation means to different constituencies – operators, contractors and third parties – and the challenges you face when talking about it within your companies and with your customers, service providers, partners. What can be done to foster a culture for the adoption of drilling automation?  What are the human factors that need to be considered?       

Human Operators as Assets to Automated Drilling

  • Greg Jamieson, University of Toronto

Land Drilling Operations: Challenges & Opportunities for Automation

  • Nestor Sanchez, ConocoPhillips

Thursday, 25 September, 0830–1000

Technical Track Session 9: Summary of Workshop Technical Discussions

Summary of Workshop Technical Discussions

Business Track Session 9: Reliability Assurance - Operational Management

What is the workflow to assure that safe and efficient operational processes are implemented alongside automation technology? Are our workflows and processes today readily adaptable to automation or is the technology disruptive enough to require major modifications to current process in order to see the full benefit?

Cognitive Computing: A Game-Changer for Information and Knowledge-Intensive Industries

  • David F. McQueeney, IBM Research

Using Hardware-In-the-Loop (HIL) Testing to Increase Confidence in Drilling and Pipehandling Control

  • Einar Leirvik, Marine Cybernetics

1030–1200

Technical Track Session 10: Summary of Workshop Technical Discussions

Review Outcome of the Technical Team

Business Track Session 10: Summary of Workshop Business Discussions

The key business drivers and issues will be summarized and discussed in breakout groups, followed by prioritizing those items of highest value and greatest urgency.

Group Discussion: The Key Business Drivers and Issues

1300–1430

Session 11: Bringing It Together

In this session the two tracks recombine to summarize the sessions, findings, and way forward.

Technical Summary

  • Clinton Chapman, Schlumberger

Business Summary

  • Fred Florence, National Oilwell Varco

Group Discussion: How are the Business and Technical Issues Related?

1500–1600

Joint Technical and Business Session 12: Workshop Wrap-Up

Review the outstanding items needed to prepare a final report and assign resources and deadlines.  The workshop report will feed into the DSATS Roadmap Project

Technical  Action Items

  • Clinton Chapman, Schlumberger

Business Action Items

  • Fred Florence, National Oilwell Varco

GREEN: Shows Technical Track
BLUE: Shows Business Track RED: Shows sessions where both tracks will be attending