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Technical Program

Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 104C

Quo Vadis Salis? Emerging Challenges and Opportunities in Health

As the need for energy grows, and the oil and gas industry utilizes remote locations, it is becoming necessary to move hundreds, even thousands of people to these locations. This displacement, along with new technologies and chemicals, poses a significant problem for both health and medical management and could place serious burdens on the operations, safety, and financial outcome of the project. Fatigue, adverse weather conditions, management of circadian rhythms, stress, emerging disease, pandemics, emergency preparedness, management of health in on-site clinics through telemedicine, chemical risk and nanotech, from risks faced "inside the fence" to the impacts on the communities adjacent to the operations, this session is designed to give an overview and help to understand the changing and expanding role of health in the oil and gas industry. Presenters will give insight on cutting-edge practices, challenge the limits of routine practice, and look to future challenges and opportunities, encouraging everybody to think outside the box.

Session Moderator:

Huma Abbasi, Chevron Corporation

Panelists:

Myles Christopher Druckman Myles Christopher Druckman
International SOS
Milton Chen Milton Chen
VSEE
Alan Bolam-Kennedy Alan Bolam-Kennedy
Institute of Remote Health Care
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 103

Employee Engagement

Session Chairpersons:

Thomas Laird Knode, Halliburton Energy Services Grp; Dominic Cooper, BSMS Inc.

One critical element of a world-class safety culture is employee engagement, across all levels of the organization. The focus tends to be on the tone at the top, but what about the tone in the middle? The message coming from front-line supervisors is the starting point for ensuring that employees are bought in to the safety program. How do we make sure employees are actively involved in identifying hazards and managing risk? What programs or methods can be employed to get employees involved in the right way? The panel will look at factors that help motivate the workforce, how that motivation can translate into leadership messaging, and what can work to help the employees fully own, and help drive, the safety culture of an organization.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168306 icon:HSE Understanding and Influencing Risk Tolerance
D.J. Fennell, Imperial Oil Resources
1120-1140 icon:HSE Invited Presenter - Fully Engaging Employees to Create a Safety Partnership
D. Cooper, BSMS Inc.
1140-1200 Invited Presenter - Bob Veazie
1200-1220 Invited Presenter - Thinking about Employee Engagement with the Brain in Mind: A Brain-Based Look at Safety Motivation
M. Brown, Sentis Pty Ltd
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 104B

Water Management I

Session Chairpersons:

Dina C. Kuykendall, Baker Hughes Inc; Joanne Galvan, Schlumberger Oilfield Services

Sustainable water use is an increasingly important topic, particularly as E&P operations expand in water-stressed areas. This session provides insight into the challenges and solutions for effective water management in the oil and gas industry. Water management will be evaluated throughout the life cycle from field operations to facilities. Best practices, new technologies, and case studies will be presented.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168376 icon:HSE The IPIECA Water Management Framework
A. Wyness, BP; P. Buttini, Eni E&P; K. Fennessey, ConocoPhillips; K. Thorne, Chevron; R.F. Romer, P. Ruck, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
1120-1140 168469 icon:HSE Water Worth Waiting for: Smart Water Management Reduces Environmental Impact
S.P. Monroe, D. McCracken, R.A. Kalbouss, Baker Hughes
1140-1200 168520 icon:HSE One Company's Upstream Water Resources Management Guide
S.R. Lunn, Imperial Oil Resources; M. Decatur, ExxonMobil Production Company; M.L. Allen, Exxon Mobil Corporation; R.A. Mire, ExxonMobil
1200-1220 168401 icon:HSE Chevron San Ardo Facility Unit (SAFU) Beneficial Produced Water Reuse for Irrigation
M. James, Chevron
Alternate 168474 icon:HSE Water Management: Concept to Implementation
K. Fennessey, J. Dell, W. Staudt, ConocoPhillips
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 102B/C

Oil Spill Response Planning

Session Chairpersons:

Colleen Hutchings, Shell; Leopoldo R. Henriquez, State Supervision of Mines

Oil spill planning and preparedness has been a priority for the industry for decades; however, the Macondo spill and other recent spill events demonstrate the need to take these plans to a new level. This session will highlight advances and practical solutions for spill response planning such as the application of risk and hazard assessment approaches and predictive cost models, and how to build government and industry cooperation in new regions of exploration.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168336 icon:HSE Risk Assessment and Planning for Offshore Oil Spill Response Preparedness
R.T. Cox, IPIECA
1120-1140 168341 icon:HSE The Global Initiative: Building Government and Industry Cooperation in New Regions
E. Bonneville, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association; T. Coolbaugh, ExxonMobil; S. Depraz, H. Murphy, P. Taylor, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
1140-1200 168414 icon:HSE A Risk-Based Methodology for Assessing Economical Impacts From Oil Spills: A Screening Matrix Based on Habitat Features and Operational Context
A. Petrone, L. La Rosa, M. Marconi, eni e&p; I. Zappacosta, enimed; P.M. Pedroni, I. Rainaldi, E. Sordini, M. Buffagni, G. De Ghetto, A. Maccagni, L. Scataglini, eni e&p; F. Parrella, C. Carter, K. Lawton, AMEC
1200-1220 168543 icon:MI A Framework for Developing Mutual Aid Arrangements
P. Toutain, International Association of Oil & Gas Producers
Alternate 168557 icon:HSE Evolving Strategies in Enhancing Preparedness to Oil Spills in Asia Pacific
D. O' Driscoll, Oil Spill Response
Alternate 168396 icon:HSE Unified Shoreline Protection and Cleanup Project - Brazil's Experience
M. Medeiros, BG Brasil; J. Moreira, Total E&P do Brasil Ltda; M.L. Oliveira, Sonangol Starfish Oil & Gas; M. Pessoa, Queiroz Galvão Exploração e Produção S.A; D.D. Sandy, Statoil Brasil Óleo e Gas Ltda
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 201 B

Indigenous Peoples: Key Learnings and Case Studies

Session Chairpersons:

Nadine Busmann, Nexen Inc.; Fernando L. Benalcazar, Equitable Origin

This technical session will focus on business efforts and programs that evaluate indigenous peoples’ programs that have been used to achieve business outcomes and glean key learnings.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168549 icon:HSE Aboriginal Relations Guiding Principles and Guidelines
W.L. Andrews, C.A. Klassen, H.S. Searle, Imperial Oil Limited
1120-1140 168554 icon:HSE SME Development Among Aboriginal Communities in Canada
F. Bourgouin, M. Oxman, BSR
1140-1200 168498 icon:HSE Social Investment Programs and Indigenous Communities: Field Case Study
M. Kuniholm, Environmental Resources Management; D. Frye, ERM; I. Sanchez, Environmental Resources Management
1200-1220 168495 icon:HSE The Outcomes of a Fishing Compensation Plan for Drilling Activities Elaborated With the Communities of the Marine Extractive Reserve of Canavieiras, Brazil
M.E. Pessoa, R. Kiperman, Queiroz Galvão Exploração e Produção; A. Nascimento, Participar Desenvolvimento e Avaliação de Projetos Sociais
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 203 A/B

Transporting Our Vital Assets - People

Session Chairpersons:

Wayne Fee, SafeDrive International DTI; Simon Williams, TTT Consulting

Transportation of our people creates significant exposure to unwanted risk. Transportation-related deaths continue to be the number one cause of industry loss. This technical session will examine through operator experience, initiatives designed to reduce the inherent risks associated with transportation and better safeguard our most vital assets.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168547 icon:HSE Fatal Injuries in Offshore Oil and Gas Operations: United States, 2003-2010
R. Hill, NIOSH/CDC; K.D. Retzer, M. O'Connor, J. Lincoln, CDC/NIOSH; M. Gunter, BLS/CFOI
1120-1140 168525 icon:HSE Assuring Safe Land Transport of Chemicals Where Regulations Do Not Exist. Safe Transport of Chemicals Can be Achieved Without Regulation
C. Abril, C. Gomez, Baker Hughes
1140-1200 168447 icon:HSE Super 6 Safe Driving Rules: Enhancing Fleet Safety Management in China
W. Leong, S. Chen, Baker Hughes
1200-1220 168325 icon:HSE Improving Vertical Seismic Profile Safety Through the Use of Specially Designed Source Vehicles
J.R. Tulett, Schlumberger; T. Dean, WesternGeco; D. Lane, Schlumberger
Alternate 168569 icon:HSE Improving Land Transport Contractor Driving Safety Performance
J.C. Condor, G. Villarreal, Schlumberger
Alternate 168566 icon:HSE Journey Management: A Strategic Approach to Reducing Your Workers’ Greatest Risk
K.D. Retzer, NIOSH/CDC; D.R. Tate, Derek Tate Consulting; R. Hill, NIOSH/CDC
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 202 B/C

Managing Culture to Drive HSE Performance II

Session Chairpersons:

Denny Kotru, Beach Energy Ltd.; Steve Merritt, Chevron Global Upstream & Gas

This session will include technical papers that describe how companies internally and with other companies and contractors improved HSE performance through culture (includes culture, human factors, and behaviors).

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168465 icon:HSE Error Management Climate as a Way to Align Safety Objectives With Operational Excellence
A. Krauss, T. Casey, Sentis
1120-1140 168420 icon:HSE Promoting Health and Safety Culture at Work Through Workforce Engagement
S. De Sanctis, A. Forzan, D. Scotti, G. Vannetti, D. Matkin, Saipem
1140-1200 168435 icon:HSE From a Multi-National to a Generative Safety Culture - A Road Map
B. Doherty, RasGas; J. Price, RasGas Co. Ltd.
1200-1220 168509 icon:HSE Target Zero: The Challenge of Achieving Sustainable Safety Excellence
T. Thanajaro, PTT E&P
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 204

Driving Social Responsibility Performance

Session Chairpersons:

Emery Brusset, Channel Research; Jonathan T. Motherwell, Jonathan T. Motherwell & Assocs

This session will cover experiences, operations, and measured performance

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168410 icon:HSE Enhancing Social Knowledge Management to Drive Performance Improvement
T. Valiyev, E. Wild, BP
1120-1140 168534 icon:HSE Facility Siting and Routing with a Focus on Sustainability
J. Motherwell, JTM & Associates, LLC; C. Weinbel, Anadarko
1140-1200 168411 icon:HSE One Company's Approach to Societal Responsibility: A Contribution to Operational Excellence and Acceptability
J. Fontaine, C.R. Chavee, N. Bou, E. Pion-Leflaive, S. Le Douaran, O. Darneau, C. Tard, Total
1200-1220 168406 icon:HSE Assessing the Actual and Potential Environmental and Socioeconomic Effects of Incidents
V.B. Eggleston, B. Hayes, ExxonMobil Development
Alternate 168451 icon:HSE The Changing Landscape of Corporate Social Responsibility Reporting
M.C. Brooke-lander, D.C. Kuykendall, Baker Hughes
Alternate 168443 icon:HSE Managing Socio-Economic Risk in Frontier Areas: A Case Study from the Falkland Islands
J.P. Wagner, S. Dowse, M. Jones, Plexus Energy
Tuesday, 18 March

1100-1230

Room 104A

Environmental Aspects of Unconventional Resource Operations

This panel will discuss a wide range of environmental impacts associated with development of unconventional oil and gas resources including air emissions, chemical use and disclosure, regulatory, waste and water use aspects.

Session Moderators:

Greta Lydecker, Chevron; Ian Michael Sealy, Schlumberger

Panelists:

Fred Palmer Fred Palmer
Shell
Joseph Paul Lima Joseph Paul Lima
Schlumberger
Dieter Hiller Dieter Hiller
ERM
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 104C

Getting Ahead of the Competency GAP

This panel will explore how the industry is and should be addressing the resourcing and verification that competency requirements meet industry demands, today and in the future. This is the people side of maintaining the industry's license to operate. This third installment is the continuation of panels from Rio and Perth. Panelists are a mix of operators, drillers, and service companies.

Session Moderator:

Jack Joseph Hinton, Baker Hughes Inc

Panelists:

John S. Nagy John S. Nagy
AECOM
Adrian Donald Hearle Adrian Donald Hearle
PetroSkills
Anthony Gaucher Anthony Gaucher
Baker Hughes
Dru Ann Cahill Dru Ann Cahill
Shell Exploration & Production Co
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 103

Road Transport in the Oil and Gas Industry

Session Chairpersons:

Derek Robert David Tate, Derek Tate Consulting; Daniel James Garstang, Hess Corp.

This session will cover road safety in the oil and gas industry: fatalities and life-altering injuries—not acceptable as a cost of doing business. How big an issue is this globally within the communities we operate? Is this an issue only for developing markets? Haven’t we beaten this yet? What can we do better or differently? Are we working together as an industry or as individuals? In this session the panelists will discuss these and others aspects of road safety in our industry and what we can do to reduce what remains the greatest exposure for a fatality or life-altering incident at any given time in the oil and gas industry—exposure applies both to our workers and to the public.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 Invited Presenter - How to Save a Million Lives (and a Billion Dollars): The Decade of Action for Road Safety
B. Dinh-Zarr, FIA Foundation
1420-1440 icon:HSE Invited Presenter - Managing Driver Behaviour
M. Watson, Shell
1440-1500 168340 icon:HSE Addressing Driving Management Challenges: A Global Perspective With a Risk-Based Approach
G. Wiraatmaja, K. Walker, D. Lawrence, Schlumberger
1500-1520 icon:HSE Invited Presenter - OGP - Land Transportation Safety Network
A. Ploeg, BP
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 104B

Water Management II

Session Chairpersons:

Zara Khatib, Petroleum Institute; Karl Fennessey, ConocoPhillips

Water resource management is becoming a priority in oil and gas operations. The first two papers in this session will focus on the development of a comprehensive framework, tools and guidelines for operators as well as for environmental and regulatory advisers that would be used in assessing water resources, water re-use, and life cycle efficiency improvement in upstream activities. The remaining two papers will focus on implementing best practices and new technologies for managing water resources and produced water.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168424 icon:HSE Integrated Water Resource Management - can this concept be of value to the Oil and Gas Sector?
R.F. Romer, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
1420-1440 168384 icon:HSE Facility Water Cycle Management in Diverse Conditions.
R.A. Rowbottom, P. Grinneiser, J. Cobb, Baker Hughes
1440-1500 168568 icon:HSE Appalachia Shale Gas Water Management Best Practices
S. Beecroft, T. Svarczkopf, Chevron
1500-1520 168349 icon:HSE Water Related Risk Assessment
L. Pornsakulsakdi, A. Sila, PTTEP
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 102B/C

Environmental Risk Methodologies

Session Chairpersons:

Sarah Elizabeth Wilford, BP America Inc (Book Orders); Margrethe Haahr, DONG Energy A/S

The application and approach to environmental risk has travelled a considerable distance in the last few years. There have been some major developments in how the industry approaches environmental risk, involving environmental experts working alongside safety and business risk experts. A number of different approaches have been developed to address how to manage environmental risk. This technical session aims to give an insight into some of these different approaches and how they are applied in the oil and gas industry.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168389 icon:HSE ESHIA Hindcasts: Advancing Environmental, Social, and Health Impact Assessment and Risk Management
R.D. Tait, K.J. Moynihan, ExxonMobil; N.A. Daetwyler, ENVIRONcorp Consulting Services; C.J. Young, P. Scott-Wilson, RSK Environment
1420-1440 168370 icon:HSE Addressing Adaptation to Climate Risks in the Oil and Gas Industry
W. Landuyt, ExxonMobil; A. Lee, L. Verduzco, Chevron; J. Castaneda, BP; R. Siveter, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
1440-1500 168416 icon:HSE Dealing With Cumulative Environmental Risk in Unlocking Access to Constrained Resources in Frontier Areas and Unconventional Resources
N.H. Wright, Atkins
1500-1520 168570 icon:HSE Improving Management of Environmental and Social Impacts and Risks: Processes, Capability Development, and Tools to Help Practitioners
K.S. Wuestenfeld, E.M. Rogers, E. Wild, R. Hill, A.H. Watlow, BP
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 201 B

Keeping Your Workforce Productive

Session Chairpersons:

Francois Pelat, Transocean Offsh Deepwater Drlg; Laurent Arnulf, International SOS

Maintaining a healthy workforce is critical in the very demanding oil and gas industry. Health issues such as cardiovascular illnesses as well as employees' poor functional fitness condition are responsible for a large number of incidents and medical events in the workplace. They are a very important area of concern. Preventive intervention and fitness programs are the very necessary tools to reduce the risk exposure and contribute actively to maintaining a healthy and productive workforce.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168311 icon:HSE Prevention of Heart Attacks and Other Cardiovascular Diseases in the Oil and Gas Industry
A. Barbey, Schlumberger; F. Mika, Saipem
1420-1440 168395 icon:HSE Medical Evaluation and Clearance for Helicopter Underwater Escape Training (HUET)
S. Frangos, Chevron; T. Bardarson, WorkSaver Employee Testing Systems; Y. Caraballo-Arias, Chevron
1440-1500 168440 icon:HSE m-Health Solution for Keeping Employees Informed
F. Mika, V. Nicosia, S. De Sanctis, G. Alfano, C. Gialdi, M. Consentino, Saipem
1500-1520 168318 icon:HSE Building Organisational Resilience: A Fit-for-Purpose Approach
C.M. Schack, I. Van den Essen, Maersk Oil
Alternate 168491 icon:HSE Health and Wellness: A Path to Fitness for Duty
N. Ryan, R. Pringle, S. Dehmer, Chevron
Alternate 168497 icon:HSE The Value of Periodic Fitness for Work Evaluations in Disease Prevention, Disease Burden Reduction, and Promotion of Public Health Initiatives Among the Local Workforce of an Offshore Drilling Company in a Developing Country: A Case Study
P. Awotula, Transocean Offshore Deepwater Drilling; F. Pelat, Transocean Intl Resources Ltd
Alternate 168564 icon:HSE Intervention Program to Control Cardiovascular and Musculoskeletal Risks for Oil and Gas Industry Employees
G. Acevedo, L. Claros, M. Rodriguez, H. Ulloa, G. Villarreal, Schlumberger
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 203 A/B

Process Safety Engineering

Session Chairpersons:

Laura Taylor Johnson, ExxonMobil Production Co.; Ed Spoelker, Marathon Oil Co

While operating in oil and gas industry involves risks, those risks can be effectively prevented or mitigated through sound facility design and development and execution of procedures. This session will explore how proper risk identification, subsequent engineering of both equipment and processes, and effective workforce awareness of those risks and mitigations can help manage process safety to prevent loss of containment events that could potentially impact our workforce, the community, or the environment.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168470 icon:MI Human Reliability Analysis for the Petroleum Industry: Lessons Learned from Applying SPAR-H
K. Van De Merwe, S. Hogenboom, DNV GL; M. Rasmussen, K. Laumann, Norwegian University of Science and Technology; K. Gould, Statoil
1420-1440 168559 icon:MI A Risk Analysis Study to Systematically Address the Critical Role of Human and Organizational Factors in Negative Pressure Test for the Offshore Drilling Industry: Policy Recommendations for HSE Specialists
M. Tabibzadeh, N. Meshkati, University of Southern California
1440-1500 168391 icon:HSE Floating LNG Challenges on Cryogenic Spill Control
A.R. Cataylo, JGC Philippines, Inc.; K. Tanigawa, JGC Corporation
1500-1520 168438 icon:HSE Congo: A Process Safety Approach for the Refurbishment of Old Facilities
L. La Rosa, A. Petrone, I. Rainaldi, eni e&p; M. Bosco, G. Gallo, Eni Congo; P. Cherubin, Tecnomare
Alternate 168347 icon:HSE High Integrity Pressure Protection System for ESP Activated Wells
S. Nelson-Bridgewater, Total; M. Hiez, Doris Engineering; J. Caudin, S. Collas, Total
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 202 B/C

Managing the Alignment and Harmonization of HSE Standards and Practices

Session Chairpersons:

Fredrick V. Jones, Environmental Resources Mgmt; Tim Ridgeway, George Siokos Consulting Pty Ltd

This session includes papers that address how companies aligned and harmonized practices and standards internally as well as externally across other companies and contractors.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168344 icon:MI The Development of Risk-Based Company HSE Standards
K. Walker, O. Oeen, Schlumberger
1420-1440 168544 icon:HSE Enhancement of Corporate Operational Excellence Management System Audit Protocols to Drive Audit Consistency
J.G. Holtman, A.T. Kalb, Chevron
1440-1500 168314 icon:HSE Growing Expectations: The Rising Tide Of Sustainability Reporting Initiatives And Their Challenges For The Oil And Gas Industry
C.O. Lindsey, Noble Energy; B. Janus, Total; H. Murphy, IPIECA
1500-1520 168407 icon:HSE HSE and Well Integrity: Friends or Foes?
V.A. Wilson, Kosmos Energy
Alternate 168428 icon:HSE Managing Health, Safety, and Environment in a Complex Simultaneous Operations (SIMOPS) Within the Context of an Integrated Projects: A Case Study
J.S. Ologe, K. Akiode, T. Jinkoji, H. Ikpa, Total E&P; E. Osugba, Ponticelli
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 204

Oil Spill Response Technologies

Session Chairpersons:

Declan Odriscoll, Oil Spill Response Ltd; Ian Sealy, Schlumberger

Time is a critical element in the response to an oil spill. Early detection of the spill is key to terminating or reducing the amount of oil spilled and, thereby, the potential environmental impact. The quantification of the oil spilled and the determination of the spill's trajectory are essential factors in the choice of response strategies, the type and quantity of resources required to combat the spill as well as the identification of sensitive environments at risk. This session provides an opportunity to understand the new technological developments and approaches underway to meet this challenge.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168523 icon:HSE Recent Advances in Oil Spill Response Technologies
T. Nedwed, D. Palandro, ExxonMobil
1420-1440 168418 icon:HSE SmartGIS project: a Web Application for Global Oil Spill Management
G. Aiello, M. Buffagni, E. Pavanel, L. Bracco, Eni E&P; S. Thorbjornsen, Det Norske Veritas; M. Meregaglia, AMEC
1440-1500 168464 icon:HSE Assessing and Selecting Remote Sensing Techniques for Early Detection of Oil Spills
T.S. Grimsrud, T.R. Nissen-Lie, V. Vandenbussche, Det Norske Veritas
1500-1520 168545 icon:HSE Oil Spill Response: Captive Balloons Rise Up High!
B. de Vals, Total E&P
Alternate 168476 icon:HSE Development of Operational and Scientific Monitoring Programs to Support Marine Spill Response
A. Lane, Environmental Resources Management; P.R. Krause, Environmental Resources Mgmt
Tuesday, 18 March

1400-1530

Room 104A

Fracking: Social Challenges and Lessons Learned of Rapid Unconventional Resource Development

The expert panel will discuss the lessons learned from addressing social performance and social impact challenges. Unconventional resource development growth has largely been a North American experience and there is a grand opportunity to expand globally. With this growth, lessons worth sharing as the hydraulic fracturing boom goes global, are beneficial. Expert speakers will represent a company with significant experience in USA shale gas and oil, an E-NGO, a state regulator organization, and a mayor of a municipality experiencing unconventional resources development. The Social Responsibility Panel for Unconventional Resource Development will discuss issues such as the social license to operate, strengthening the understanding of social responsibility within a company, provide hands-on stakeholder engagement, social issues related to water, and also which stakeholders a company reaches.

Session Moderator:

Paul P. Krishna, Exxon Mobil Corporation

Panelists:

Mike Paque Mike Paque
Groundwater Protection Council
Scott Anderson Scott Anderson
EDF
Michael Ray Dunkel Michael Ray Dunkel
Pioneer Natural Resources
Ward Koeser Ward Koeser
City of Williston, North Dakota
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 104C

From the Arctic to Australia: How Joint Industry Initiatives are Changing Spill Prevention and Safety Offshore

The Macondo accident and the Montara incident that preceded it have had far-reaching consequences on the offshore oil and gas industry with an increased regulatory scrutiny on operators. The industry has risen to the challenge to demonstrate the competency of employees in improving oversight of operations, maintenance, and training; introducing independent testing and certification of key equipment; and the imposition of new standards, hardware and systems addressing prevention, intervention and response. Many of these activities, which are now starting to produce concrete results, have only been possible through the use of Joint Industry Projects (JIPs). This panel session will describe several of these JIPs and explore the challenges and successes they have encountered along the way.

Session Moderator:

Arden David Ahnell, BP

Panelists:

Charles R. Williams Charles R. Williams
Center For Offshore Safety
David Dickins David Dickins
Greg DeMarco Greg DeMarco
ExxonMobil
Robert T. Cox Robert T. Cox
IPIECA
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 103

Human Rights: Assessing Impacts and Grievance Management

This human rights panel will focus on actual practices and experiences from implementation. Assessment of impacts and grievance management learnings will be discussed. Potential Speakers: Berthold Beitz Professor in Human Rights and International Affairs at Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government (K. Moynihan); Dr. Margaret Jungk, Director of the Human Rights and Business Department at the Danish Institute for Human Rights; Member of The United Nations Working Group on Business and Human Rights (R. Cleland).

Session Moderators:

Margaret Roper Cleland, IPIECA; Krish Ravishankar, Occidental Oil & Gas Corporation

Panelists:

Faris Natour Faris Natour
BSR
Richard Boele Richard Boele
Banarra
Gabriella Herzog Gabriella Herzog
Hess Corp.
Tam Robert Nguyen Tam Robert Nguyen
Bechtel Corp
Rosa Orellana
International Finance Corp.
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 104B

Environmental Risk Case Studies

Session Chairpersons:

Ylva Maria Gilbert, Gaia Consulting; Jay Paul Wagner, Plexus Energy

Managing environmental risks from exploration and production operations requires an array of tools and methodologies to help identify, model, develop, and execute effective risk management. This requirement applies to the whole asset life from design to decommissioning. This session provides cases from onshore and offshore operations of different tools and approaches employed to: understand the impacts from normal operations or unforeseen events; identify what can go wrong; understand how unforeseen and/or undesirable events can be prevented through design, technology, processes, and by identification of critical elements and standards; and develop and carry out efficient mitigation plans to minimize detrimental effects if the risk is realized.

Time Paper # Presentation
1600-1620 168343 icon:HSE Assessing Exploratory Drilling Impacts on an Arctic Deepwater Sea-Pen Habitat Offshore Norway
J.E. Paulsen, Eni Norge; S.K. Cochrane, Ø. Leikvin, J. Hansen, Akvaplan-Niva; H.E. Torbergsen, S. Pierfelici, Eni Norge
1620-1640 168475 icon:HSE Performance Standards for Environmentally Critical Elements
Z. Yessekeyeva, V. Vandenbussche, Det Norske Veritas
1640-1700 168539 icon:HSE The Use of a Weight-of-Evidence Approach in Assessing the Ecological Effects of Produced Water Discharge Offshore Nigeria
N. Richardson, A. Tilstone, Battelle
1700-1720 168492 icon:HSE Using an Environmental Footprint Analysis to Evaluate the Sustainability of Remedial Alternatives
D. Kuykendall, Baker Hughes; A. McMullan, Weston Solutions
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 102B/C

Sensitive Environments

Session Chairpersons:

Wendy Brown, Total E&P France; Steve Laking, Environmental Resources Mgmt

Oil and gas activities in sensitive environments require comprehensive environmental studies of baseline conditions and potential environmental impacts, together with implementation of often-innovative management or mitigation measures and follow-up monitoring programs. This technical session will include best-practice methodological approaches together with case studies showing examples of these approaches in different parts of the world.

Time Paper # Presentation
1600-1620 168352 icon:HSE Making the Connection: Oil and Gas Management of Natural Resources
P.M. Pedroni, Eni E&P; K. Fennessey, ConocoPhillips; R.F. Romer, P. Ruck, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
1620-1640 168419 icon:HSE A Deeper Perspective: 5 Years of The Delos Project
R.C. O'Brien, A. Walls, J. Clarke, S. Pereira Costa, S. Oliviera, BP; K. Smith, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute; I. Priede, Oceanlab; M. Vardaro, Oregon State University; G. Rowe, Texas A&M; D. Bailey, R. Milligan, University of Glasgow; H. Ruhl, National Oceanography Centre; B.B. Sangolay, National Institute of Fisheries Research
1640-1700 168328 icon:MI "Environmental Monitoring and Modeling of Drilling Discharges at a Location with Vulnerable Seabed Fauna: Comparison between Field Measurements and Model Simulations"
T.K. Frost, J.L. Myrhaug, Statoil; M. Ditlevsen, H. Rye, SINTEF Materials & Chemistry
1700-1720 168351 icon:HSE Wetlands and Endangered Species Management
R.A. Rowbottom, D.C. Kuykendall, C. Clodfelter, Baker Hughes
Alternate 168373 icon:HSE Test Of Analytical Approaches For Assessing Dispersal Of Barium Free Drilling Discharges On Seabed
A. Ulfsnes, T. Moeskeland, DNV GL
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 201 B

Thinking Right About Occupational Behavior

Session Chairpersons:

Frano Mika, Saipem; Alexander Barbey, Schlumberger

Maintaining one’s physical and mental fitness requires the courage to reconsider and eventually change one’s mindset and attitudes, including food habits and lifestyle. Any behavioral change is a joint venture between the company and the employee.

Time Paper # Presentation
1600-1620 168364 icon:HSE Creating a Healthy Foodservice
C. Stevens, J. Stelmach, J. Davis-Street, Chevron
1620-1640 168522 icon:HSE Integrating Mental and Behavioral Health into Primary Care Clinics to Develop a System of Care Following the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill
H.J. Osofsky, J.D. Osofsky, J. Wells, LSU Health Sciences Center; C. Weems, University of New Orleans; T.C. Hansel, L. King, A. Ciccone, LSU Health Sciences Center
1640-1700 168404 icon:HSE Engaging and Motivating for Health Behavior Change
A. Shannon, Chevron; C. Drew, US Benefits; J. Davis-Street, Chevron
1700-1720 168386 icon:HSE Using New Means of Communication to Mitigate Expatriate Psychological Stress: an Example of E-Consultation Platform
B. Astruc, Eutelmed; L. Jammes, Actys-BEE; N. Hopman, Independant consultant
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 203 A/B

Process Safety Management

Session Chairpersons:

Ash John Stanley, Subsea 7 Singapore Contracting Pte Ltd; Susan I. Staley, Shell Exploration & Production Co

To prevent major incidents it is recommended that major hazard organization focus on seven key elements: 1) Leadership is demonstrated through actions from the top, so that all managers and staff know that process safety is being taken seriously. 2) Process safety management taking place at all business levels is a company board issue and requires clear accountability at all levels, together with effective measurement systems, including indicators of process safety performance (allowing learning from near misses and pre-cursor events, and avoiding major incidents). 3) Real and dynamic risk assessments exist to ensure that staff understand the links between hazards and the risks they create and the control measures in place to handle the barriers to failure. 4) Robust management of change approaches capture real-time plant and operational issues so that today's plant and operating envelope are properly understood by those who need to know. 5) Sustainability involves the business focusing on long-term performance so that investment and maintenance decisions, in particular, are focused on the longer term, while also maintaining a responsible customer approach to any activities that are contracted out. 6) Well-trained and competent people at all levels in the organization and in sufficient numbers stand ready to address steady state operation, periods of change and emergency situations, and the infrastructure to ensure sustained competency. 7) A learning organization is one that not only values and encourages learning from its own experiences but looks beyond itself for lessons and avoids complacency. We all need to raise the bar on process safety management, leadership, and safety culture across the whole industry and the papers in this session highlight the significance of these aspects.

Time Paper # Presentation
1600-1620 168437 icon:HSE An Overarching Strategy for Safety Critical Elements Assessment and Management
M. Cortina, Eni; E. Pavli, G. Antinolfi, L. La Rosa, I. Rainaldi, A. Petrone, Eni E&P
1620-1640 168335 icon:HSE Proactive Safety Campaign in Kuwait Reduces Personnel Injury Incidents to Zero
F. Azparren, Chevron; P.G. Anthony, J. Pohl, R. D'Silva, A. Al-Khabbaz, Schlumberger; O. Salih, Schlumberger Well Services
1640-1700 168363 icon:HSE Management of Change (MOC) in Upstream Oil and Gas Brownfield Facilities
O.M. Saleem, Chevron USA, San Joaquin Valley Business Unit; S.B. Kovach, Chevron Energy Technology Company
1700-1720 168943 icon:HSE Harmonization of Quantitative Risk Assessment (QRA) Studies in One Company's Affiliates
B. Fardeau, GDF SUEZ E&P Intenational; A. Augustin, A. Ait Malek, GDF SUEZ E&P International; D. Ruault, GDF SUEZ EP International
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 202 B/C

Managing the Understanding and Improvement in HSE Performance II

Session Chairpersons:

Elie Daher, United Safety; Hugh Campbell, Total ABK

This technical session will showcase papers from companies that learned from their analysis and observations of their workplaces and interactions between workgroups to better understand how they could improve HSE Performance.

Time Paper # Presentation
1600-1620 168374 icon:HSE Implementation of Best Environmental Practices in an Oil and Gas Company: Myth or Reality?
I. Najera, C.A. Salvador, C. Santamaria, Repsol E&P
1620-1640 168501 icon:HSE Using Technical Competence to Drive High-Grade Safety Performance
M.D. Novia, M. Fernandes, Baker Hughes
1640-1700 168575 icon:HSE HES Assessments of Non-Operated Joint Ventures
G. Parker, Chevron
1700-1720 168504 icon:HSE Do You See What I See? Viewing Safety From the Lens of a Contractor
M. Brown, A. Krauss, Sentis
Alternate 168499 icon:HSE Documenting Failure or Driving Business Performance? Developing and Delivering Onshore Exploration and Production Audit Programs
P. Taylor, ERM
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 204

Well Operations Safety

Session Chairpersons:

Patrick Toutain, OGP; Mark D. O'Byrne, Schlumberger Oilfield Services

This technical session reflects the six main industry concerns; ensuring well risks are ALARP (as low as reasonably practicable); correct assessment of subterranean conditions; proper consideration of suspension and abandonment issues; appropriate well examination schemes where required; provision of regular reports to the regulators as appropriate; and promotion of competence in those undertaking well operations. The papers selected highlight the consequences of a loss of primary containment with a path to the reservoir. Any effort that increases awareness and understanding of barriers is of great benefit. Tools that are simple and easily understood by those executing the work at the wellhead are of significant value to all concerned. They provide an increased awareness of the significant benefits to be gained by applying process safety techniques to well operations.

Time Paper # Presentation
1600-1620 168516 icon:HSE Bowtie and Job Hazard Analysis: A Case Study to Communicate the Barrier Philosophy as it Relates to Process Safety in Well Operations
J. Go Boncan, Baker Hughes
1620-1640 168324 icon:HSE Owning the Process Safety Moment: Real-Time Risk Management and Response
S.J. Jose, G. Arango, P. Flichy, J.M. Featherly, Baker Hughes
1640-1700 168446 icon:DC Enhancing Safety in Offshore Well Control by Applying Intelligent Drillpipe
A. Karimi Vajargah, S.Z. Miska, M. Yu, M.E. Ozbayoglu, University of Tulsa
1700-1720 168321 icon:HSE HPHT Cement Sheath Integrity Evaluation Method for Unconventional Wells
A. Shadravan, J.J. Schubert, Texas A&M University; M. Amani, Texas A&M University At Qatar; C. Teodoriu, Technology University Clausthal
Alternate 168532 icon:HSE Increasing Barrier Awareness at the Well Site During Intervention Operations
J.A. Kilfoyle, BP
Alternate 168312 icon:HSE Tools for Increasing Well Operations Safety: Training and Certification
F. Moretti, M. Bogaerts, A.M. Mendiola, G.G. De Bruijn, A. Gonzalez, E. Belleggia, Schlumberger
Tuesday, 18 March

1600-1730

Room 104A

Human Factors

Discussion 1 Safety culture has been defined in many ways, usually too abstractly for the oilfield; this has made discussions difficult. Organizational culture can either be defined in abstract terms of values, beliefs and attitudes, or more practically in terms of “How we do things around here”. A culture reflects attitudes that are co-operatively shared by all stakeholders, including workforce, management and regulators. These definitions are neutral with respect to safety, so a culture of safety is extra; one where people do things giving safety a priority and believing that high levels of safety performance are feasible and desirable. Discussion 2 Despite the best efforts of many companies, and the development of a range of investigation tools and techniques to support identification of underlying human and organizational causes, routinely investigating incidents to properly understand the reasons why human performance fails – going “beyond human error” – is still relatively uncommon in the global oil and gas industry. The key is to pursue a deeper understanding of the reasons why “human error” occurred, and especially the organizational and cultural factors that ‘set-up’ the human for failure.

Session Moderator:

Luciano Scataglini, Eni E&P

Panelists:

Andrew Dingee Andrew Dingee
BP Engineering