SPE logo

Technical Program

Wednesday, 19 March

1100-1230

Room 104C

Emerging Health Issues in Hydraulic Fracturing

Session Chairpersons:

Becky L. Randolph, Baker Hughes Solutions; Marcos Sanchez, Shell Oil Company(Petro)

America's oil and natural gas renaissance has been fueled by a revolution in hydraulic fracturing, but that rapid expansion also raises new challenges in the field of occupational health and industrial hygiene. Even though hydraulic fracturing is one of many stimulation techniques lasting only three to five days in the decades-long life of a production well, this stimulation technique has attracted much attention. Join us for a technical panel discussion concerning how occupational and industrial health specialists are addressing topical issues, including health issues during hydraulic fracturing, occupational exposures to respirable crystalline silica, questions of chemical disclosure, and issues surrounding community engagement. Then share your ideas for how the industry can more effectively leverage the technical expertise of industrial hygiene and occupational health experts to better communicate our commitment to the protection of workers, the environment, and the public.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1125 168402 icon:HSE Working Together to Address the Occupational Health Hazards of Hydraulic Fracturing
R. Nocco, M. Postage, A. Downey, P. Ohrin, M. Jones, P. Feldman, Chevron
1125-1200 168518 icon:HSE Collaborative Industry Initiative to Assess Potential Health Effects Related to the Production of Unconventional Resources
D. Devlin, Exxon Mobil; P. Beatty, American Petroleum Institute; Z. Naufal, Chevron ETC; S. Sarang, Shell; R. White, American Petroleum Institute
1200-1225 168326 icon:HSE A Chemical Risk Prioritization Scoring Process for the Oil and Gas Exploration and Production Industry
K.M. Koblis, Noble Energy; M.W. Kierski, J.P. Staveley, E.L. Freeman, Exponent
Wednesday, 19 March

1100-1230

Room 104B

Marine Environments

Session Chairpersons:

Fredrick V. Jones, Environmental Resources Mgmt; Faye Gerard, BP

Hydrocarbon resources are not easy to find, nor are they often located in convenient places for oil or gas to be extracted, processed, and sent to market. Much of the world's petroleum production comes from offshore wells, and many facilities are located within sensitive marine environments. The conservation of biodiversity and maintenance of ecological processes and systems are among the core objectives of ecologically sustainable development. The responsible extraction of oil and gas resources from marine environments is consistent with achieving these objectives. This session explores some of the issues faced by the oil and gas industry operating within marine environments, delving into how the industry can better understand marine ecosystems; model potential impacts on marine organisms; and manage the associated environmental risks.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168348 icon:HSE The IPIECA Marine Geospatial Bibliography
I. Voparil, Shell; S. Connick, Chevron; M. Marconi, Eni E&P; C. Engstrom, Husky Energy; P. Ruck, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association
1120-1140 168350 icon:HSE Green lighting the Way: Managing Impacts From Offshore Platform Lighting on Migratory Birds
J.M. Marquenie, J.P. Wagner, Plexus Energy; M.T. Stephenson, M. T. Stephenson & Associates; L. Lucas, WorleyParsons Services
1140-1200 168468 icon:HSE Breaking the Sound Barrier: Sound Impacts in New Frontier Areas for Energy Development
N.H. Wright, Atkins
1200-1220 168412 icon:HSE Review of Sound and Marine Life Guidelines for Marine Seismic Operations
N. Martin, International Association of Geophysical Contractors; K.A. Stjohn, IAGC; G.C. Gill, International Association of Geophysical Contractors
Alternate 168369 icon:HSE Coral Relocation as Habitat Mitigation for Impacts From the Barzan Gas Project Pipeline Construction, Offshore Qatar
K. Deb, RasGas; A. McCarthy, B. Harkanson, CSA Ocean Sciences Inc. USA
Wednesday, 19 March

1100-1230

Room 102B/C

Oil and Gas Industry HSE Performance

Session Chairpersons:

Emmanuel Garland, Total E&P; Stewart Fraser, Fraser HSSE Ltd

This technical session presents the four measures of oil and gas HSE performance as tracked by the International Association of Oil and Gas Producers: health performance indicators; safety performance; process safety performance; and environmental performance indicators.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168423 icon:HSE Environmental Performance in the E&P Industry: Data for 2011 and 2012
J.A. Campbell, W.M. Poore, International Association of Oil & Gas Producers
1120-1140 168514 icon:HSE Upstream Oil and Gas Industry Process Safety Event Data: A First Step
K. Walker, Schlumberger; P. Toutain, W. Poore, International Association of Oil & Gas Producers
1140-1200 168359 icon:HSE Oil and Gas Industry Leading Health Performance Indicators
A. Martin, Tillies Consultancy; K. Walker, Schlumberger
1200-1220 168375 icon:HSE Continuing the Efforts to Learn From Industry Safety Data
K. Walker, Schlumberger; P. Toutain, W. Poore, International Association of Oil & Gas Producers
Wednesday, 19 March

1100-1230

Room 201 B

Human Rights: Emerging Best Practices for Risk Management

Session Chairpersons:

Stanley Sokul, Exxon Mobil Corporation; Aaron Padilla, Chevron Corporation

This technical session will address guiding principles and various approaches for addressing human rights in upstream oil and gas operations.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168431 icon:HSE UN Guiding Principles on Business and Human Rights: Simultaneous Implementation and Learning
N. Safavi, E. Wild, BP
1120-1140 168378 icon:HSE Identification of Potential Human Rights Impacts: A Comparison of Two Approaches
J. Vallat, Total; J. Lennock, Risk&Co; C. Gouley, Artelia
1140-1200 168467 icon:HSE Incorporating Respect for Human Rights in Petroleum Projects in Papua New Guinea: Is Compliance Measurement Possible or is Performance About Setting Standards for Acceptable Practice?
S. Genter, I. Bryson, Environmental Resources Management
1200-1220 168489 icon:HSE Conservation Agreements: Integrating Social and Environmental Investments in Liberia
N. Anwar, Chevron Africa & Latin America E&P; D. Howard, Chevron; J. Donovan-Allen, Conservation International Liberia; B. Sayon, E. Niesten, M.C. Weikel, M. Betre, Conservation International
Alternate 168388 icon:HSE Ethics in Humanitarian Assistance for Host Communities
A. Win, Total E&P; S. Win, Total E&P Myanmar
Wednesday, 19 March

1100-1230

Room 203 A/B

Behavioral Safety

Session Chairpersons:

Dominic Cooper, BSMS Inc.; Annamaria Petrone, Eni E&P

This technical session focuses on behavioral safety intended as the set of strategies designed to help workers engage in safe behaviors when they do their jobs. We are all aware that oil and gas is a risky business and behavior-based safety is a topic that has been around for a long time, but unfortunately, in E&P activities there is still a significant number of accidents reportedly caused by inappropriate behavior, highlighting the continued need for improvement. Every organization tries to cope with this issue, promoting a number of safety campaigns that focus on safe-versus-unsafe behavior, compliance with safety golden rules and many other rules aiming at decreasing incidents and improving safety performances and statistics. Yet the truth is that getting people to do what they are supposed to do and engaging them adequately and effectively in all the different safety campaigns still remains a big challenge for every company. The papers presented in the session will describe some outstanding initiatives and research promoted by oil companies and contractors to identify the elements that represent a steep change in traditional approaches on the path to a zero-accident work environment. Some lessons learned in the area of measuring performance will also be presented, and we will explore some of the elements that can play a role in fatality prevention. We will also explore elements that affect individual behavior such as the employees’ living environment and home conditions. Other crucial points discussed in this session will include how to improve organizations’ ability to understand and learn from serious incidents enhancing incident investigation reporting strategy to effectively reduce the occurrence and recurrence of unwanted hazardous events, and last but not least, how to effectively engage a significant part of the workforce in key HSE programs and campaigns.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 168377 icon:HSE Lessons Learned in Executing Leading Safety Indicators
J. Toellner, ExxonMobil
1120-1140 168533 icon:HSE Safety Captain: A Safety Leadership Program
W.J. Capote Mendoza, Schlumberger
1140-1200 168394 icon:HSE Risk-Based Approach to Fatality Prevention
M. Donato, Chevron
1200-1220 168429 icon:HSE Safety Culture Development on Robust BO&I Program With IIF
J. Brand, Branzan Project; T. Sugimoto, JGC
Alternate 168480 icon:HSE The Commentary Climb: How to Position Intelligence Over Instinct
G. Childress, Express Energy Services
Wednesday, 19 March

1100-1230

Room 202 B/C

Managing Data and Information to Better Drive HSE Performance

Session Chairpersons:

Dominique Grepinet, Total E&P; Donald Smith, Eni UK Limited

This technical session includes papers that address how to ensure we leverage and use data and information (be it health, safety, environmental, process safety, social responsibility, or security) to ensure we learn, adapt, and make changes to drive improvements in how HSE performance is managed and delivered. Note: The inclusion of the three OGP/IPIECA papers, 648, 369 and 370, is predicated on these papers being rewritten into a single paper that focuses on what the industry should be doing to use and leverage these three sets of data (safety, health, and process safety). It is not to be a mere presentation of the data, but what we should be doing because we as an industry have the data.

Time Paper # Presentation
1100-1120 Invited Presenter_Kirsty Walker
1120-1140 168308 icon:HSE New Evidence on the Drivers of HSE Incidents and Reporting, and Implications for HSE Policy
C.J. Jablonowski, Shell E&P; J.J. Tolle, Value Discovery LLC
1140-1200 168515 icon:HSE SEMS after the Audits
I.S. Sutton, Sutton Technical Books
1200-1220 168546 icon:MI Failure Rate Data: How Equipment Fails, Not Just a Numbers Game
G. Pettitt, S. Brazier, Environmental Resources Management; P. Pennicott, ENI International Resources Ltd
Alternate 168567 icon:HSE Continuing Development of a Safety Culture From the Ground Up: Building Competencies of HSE Employees to Become Better Business Partners to the Organization
S. Acosta, K. Breitsprecher, R. Moffatt, A. Worley, Baker Hughes
Alternate 168320 icon:HSE Oil and Gas E&P Cyber Security: Perfect Storm Threat Review
A.L. Smith, Risk Management Systems
Wednesday, 19 March

1400-1530

Room 104C

Engaging the Next Generation to Believe and Behave Safely

This panel addresses how the industry best engages not only today’s workforce, but also tomorrow’s, to ensure new HSE attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors are engrained. This links to the efforts of young professionals to better understand what motivates the next generation to lead HSE. Panelists include experts from industries where new generation demographic analysis provides insights and results into what motivates the next generation to have HSE fundamental to their beliefs and behaviors.

Session Moderator:

John M. Karish, ENSCO plc

Panelists:

Mary Beth Snodgrass Mary Beth Snodgrass
Acorn International
Rhona Flin Rhona Flin
University of Aberdeen
Dave J. Fennell Dave J. Fennell
Imperial Oil Resources Ltd.
Ulrich Peball Ulrich Peball
OMV Petrom SA
Wednesday, 19 March

1400-1530

Room 201 B

Challenging Environments

Session Chairpersons:

David Flower, BP plc; Marie Sopko, Nexen Inc.

As oil and gas exploration moves forward into even more challenging environments, this session will consider the impact of infectious diseases, extreme altitude changes, community health issues, and the importance of well-established topside medical support.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168372 icon:HSE Altitude Illness, Peru and Papua New Guinea: A Unique Workplace Hazard
T. Hochberg, International SOS
1420-1440 168477 icon:HSE Prevention and Control of Emerging Infectious Disease Outbreaks in Global Oil and Gas Workplaces
M. Diara, ExxonMobil; S. Ngunjiri, Fircroft; A. Brown Maruziak, Kelly Services; A. Ben Edet, R. Plenderleith, M. Modrick, D. Buford, ExxonMobil
1440-1500 168427 icon:HSE Learning and Benefits of Well-Defined and Well-Structured Topside Medical Support in the Offshore Drilling Industry Based on 10 Years of Global Experience With a Large Offshore Drilling Contractor
F. Pelat, Transocean Intl Resources Ltd; P. Awotula, Transocean Support Services Nigeria Ltd
1500-1520 168531 icon:HSE One Company's Angola Sickle Cells Program
S. Abreu, M. Arango, I. Flores, V. Andrande, Chevron
Alternate 168417 icon:HSE Malaria: Risk Assessment versus Impact Assessment
F. Marouze, CGG; P. Guibert, International SOS
Alternate 168565 icon:HSE Upstream Nigeria Telemedicine Pilot Program
S.I. Dim, B. Aliyu, ExxonMobil
Alternate 168484 icon:HSE Medical Record Review: Helping Make Offshore and Remote Healthcare Better
W.M. Fleetwood, FrontierMEDEX
Wednesday, 19 March

1400-1530

Room 203 A/B

Risk Management

Session Chairpersons:

Ian M. Threadgold, Threadgold Safety Management; Andrew Lloyd Smith, Risk Management Systems

This session will focus on new trends using risk management tools in business decisions. For many years various risk assessment techniques, like HAZOP and QRA, have been used to prove soundness and safety of a design concept or an operational process. Unfortunately, those techniques were generally not familiar to engineering and operations teams, and the practical implications of risk assessment results may not have been fully understood and practiced in the field. In general, the ownership of risk assessment techniques and, consequently, their deliverables have been frequently considered in charge of HSE rather than being a line management direct responsibility. These limitations of the risk assessment techniques may cause a false perception of an asset safety level. This could lead to management of plants not in line with risk assessment assumptions, which may invalidate risk assessment results. The papers presented in this session address these concerns and show examples of risk information transfer to the work environment and workforce engagement in the safety case. They also show new methodologies to capture risk reduction or deterioration as a function of plant age and complexity, and the tools aimed at raising awareness about the importance of ensuring fitness and readiness of risk reduction barriers in place. This new idea of a user-friendly risk management approach may contribute to the development of a "major accident" prevention culture, thereby forming the basis of a process safety management system.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168488 icon:HSE Maximizing Safety Case Value With Meaningful Workforce Engagement
R. Bennett, M. Ramsden, R. Steer, Environmental Resources Management
1420-1440 168403 icon:HSE Facility Risk Profile: A Methodology of Putting Various Risk Information to Work
O.M. Saleem, Chevron USA, San Joaquin Valley Business Unit; S.B. Kovach, Chevron Energy Technology Company
1440-1500 168436 icon:HSE Risk Management in the Process Industry-New Directions With Bayesian Approach
G. Unnikrishnan, F. Al-Zalzalah, Kuwait Oil Company; N. Siddiqui, D. Shrihari, University of Petroleum and Energy Studies
1500-1520 168486 icon:HSE Understanding the ALARP Concept: Its Origin and Application
M. Taylor, K.R. Israni, Environmental Resources Management
Wednesday, 19 March

1400-1530

Room 204

Building Community Relationships and Addressing Grievances

Session Chairpersons:

Gabriella Herzog, Hess Corp.; Claudine Renee Chavee, Total

This session will focus on operational experiences that involve implementing and managing grievance mechanisms in support of business objectives. It will also cover emerging issues and tie into themes of issues that should keep management awake.

Time Paper # Presentation
1400-1420 168333 icon:HSE Operational Level Grievance Mechanisms for Business and Human Rights
M.R. Cleland, International Petroleum Industry Environmental Conservation Association; E. Wild, BP; S. Boladeras, BG Group
1420-1440 168354 icon:HSE Re-Engaging With Local Stakeholders in the Mature Oil and Gas Mahakam Block on Kalimantan Island, Indonesia
A. Dimier, H. Hidayatullah, Total E&P
1440-1500 168551 icon:HSE Developing Effective Remedies: Five Stages of Remedying Human Rights Infringements
F. Natour, C. Poynton, M. Raimondi, BSR
1500-1520 168524 icon:HSE Point Thomson Project’s Alaska North Slope Borough Community Engagement Program
R. Schmidt, ExxonMobil Development
Alternate 168479 icon:HSE Transparency and Participative Approach for Effective Social Acceptability of Hydrocarbon Projects
C. Trigo, Total E&P
Wednesday, 19 March

1400-1530

Room 104A

The Three C's: Cooperation, Coordination, and Communication

This panel will discuss the interactions that take place among operators, drilling contractors, and service companies during the course of well design, planning, and execution of operations. The scope includes both offshore and onshore operations. Clarity of roles and responsibilities, particularly in the space where these three companies intersect, will be addressed.

Session Moderators:

Terry L. Thoem, Thoem & Associates; Steve Flynn, BP Intl. Ltd.

Panelists:

James W. Seale James W. Seale
Exxon Mobil Corporation
Dirk Kolnsberg Dirk Kolnsberg
Ensco
Jack J. Hinton Jack J. Hinton
Baker Hughes Inc