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Well Testing

The value of information has a ubiquitous and sometimes pervasive role in modern well testing. From exploration to field management to surveillance, well-test practitioners deal with a wide array of measurements (e.g., pressure, flow rates, temperature, and fluid analysis) that, more often than not, encompass large amounts of data. This is particularly true for long-term-production-data analysis of established fields, and one can argue the same for any current pressure-transient analysis that also has benefited from improved and more-robust data-acquisition available today. Likewise, dynamic information through downhole testing equipment can be acquired in real time—wirelessly and at sampling frequencies that were not possible only a decade ago.

Yet what seems to be a relative abundance of data often is challenged by the complex environments in which we operate and by our need to assess its value against associated costs and business risks. One way to look at this is under the premise that, while “perfect” information is beneficial to have, it also is costly to acquire and economically inefficient. Is there a unique answer in our choice of type curves, material balance, or specialized graphs? Should we account for multiphase flow or rock compaction? More importantly, what is the value of the next-best substitute for the information we require? And can this substitute information still allow us to meet our testing objectives? Herein lies the delicate balance between our choices of risk and uncertainty, which brings us to the message of this feature: We should not look for data-rich, but information-rich, content that meets our testing needs.

The papers selected for this feature describe exciting advances and opportunities in well testing. They also show that the proper use of advanced techniques can lead to maximizing the value of the information at hand, even in hostile and unconventional situations.

Read the synopses in the February 2012 issue of JPT.

Renzo Angeles, SPE, is a Senior Engineering Specialist with ExxonMobil Upstream Research Company. His 12 years’ experience includes technical consulting in North and South America, the Middle East, Europe, and Asia. Angeles works with the unconventional-resources integrated project, and his areas of interest include well testing, formation testing, hydraulic fracturing, and near-wellbore modeling. Angeles holds MS and PhD degrees in petroleum engineering from the University of Texas at Austin, and has published 16 papers. He serves on the JPT Editorial Committee.

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