Following an increased investment in advanced seismic solutions, we have
experienced some remarkable boundary shifts in seismic-data quality in recent years.
Significant improvements have been achieved in densely sampled wide-azimuth seismic
acquisition and in wave-equation-based imaging techniques, such as full-waveform
inversion and reverse time-migration, in processing. Also, emerging marine
broadband-seismic solutions promise a real step change in resolution, offering
unprecedented detail in subsurface interpretation and enhanced penetration of low
frequencies for deep imaging.

Massive changes are also happening in the amount of data being acquired,
leading to new challenges in processing and interpretation. The channel count for
onshore-acquisition systems continues to increase, and new records have been set in
the towing capacity of marine-seismic vessels. These continuing developments enable
efficient acquisition of larger and denser surveys with longer offsets and rich azimuth
data. However, these developments generally are also associated with an increased
footprint that must be managed both operationally and environmentally.

It is, therefore, evident that not all new techniques can be ported easily to all environments.
Adequate solutions must be chosen from the growing geophysical toolbox,
balancing technical aspects with operational constraints and business requirements.
Large-scale regional exploration surveys in environmentally sensitive or remote areas
can differ significantly from detailed surveys required for infill-drilling targets. Flexible
and scalable survey techniques are particularly important to enable smart data
acquisition in areas where access had been notoriously difficult because of environmental,
operational, or economic restrictions.

This seismic feature provides examples for ongoing boundary shifts in seismic
technologies complemented by a guide for the interpretation of microseismic data
and a pilot study about pushing time-lapse seismic monitoring toward carbonate reservoirs.
A common element of the documented successes is continued commitment to
and investment in technology and a close integration with business.

Read the paper synopses in the March 2012 issue of JPT.

Gerd Kleemeyer, SPE, leads the Integrated Geophysical Services team in Shell’s Global Solutions Upstream organization in Rijswijk, the Netherlands. During 17 years with Shell, he has worked on exploration and development projects in the Netherlands, Norway, the UK, and Russia, and as geophysical consultant for global new-venture exploration. Kleemeyer holds an MS degree from the Technical University of Clausthal, Germany, and he serves on the JPT Editorial Committee.