In the 2 years since the Macondo incident, we have seen a lot of action toward new regulations, procedures, and norms to be implemented in an attempt to reduce the risks of those tragic events happening again. But the industry did not stop working; wells were drilled and completed, even in the Gulf of Mexico after the long period of inactivity. As expected, we saw a big focus on subsea-equipment testing and procedures and on needed equipment improvements. But we also saw many reports highlighting improved operational performance, confirming that the industry continues with significant activity.

We should work proactively with the public and regulators to bring a framework that will lead to a safer environment for everyone. And we should not be happy with just more paperwork that may not bring needed effective improvement. For obvious reasons, the first step has been focused on the equipment responsible for providing the last barrier of protection, the blowout preventer (BOP). One paper describes BOP upgrades, and another one discusses software-based deepwater-BOP testing. We all must recognize that there has not been a significant advance in terms of BOP testing in
the last 30 years. We are still relying, most of the time, on the old paper disks to record tests and on forms filled in by hand to confirm the pressure and duration of the tests prepared on each component tested. We should do much better than that.

The third paper highlights the drilling campaign in a promising offshore area in Brazil. But do not forget the underground blowout that leaked oil into the ocean offshore Brazil a few months ago, reminding us that continuous improvement of all offshore operations must take place. The alternative is that we again will face setbacks like those in the Gulf of Mexico after the Macondo accident.

Read the paper synopses in the April 2012 issue of JPT.

Helio Santos, SPE, is President of Safekick Limited. In his 29 years in the industry, Santos worked as a Drilling Engineer for Petrobras both onshore and offshore and led several projects in the Research and Development Center. He also was with Impact Engineering Solutions as Vice-President of Technology, President of Impact Solutions Group, and President of Secure Drilling, which was acquired by Weatherford. Santos earned BS and MS degrees in civil engineering from Catholic University of Rio de Janeiro and a PhD degree in geological engineering from the University of Oklahoma. He has authored several SPE papers, holds two patents, has served on SPE conference and Advanced Technology Workshop committees, and serves on the JPT Editorial Committee.