Category Archives: Projects, Facilities and Construction

Web Events

New Web Event on Measurement Accuracy

Join a live web event on 4 February presented by the PFC Study Group on “What you need to know about Attaining and Maintaining Accurate Fiscal and Allocation.” This presentation will provide an insight in to Shell best practices for selection of fit for purpose meters, and fit-for-purpose maintenance, operation and calibration employed to ensure that the minimum level of accuracy and data integrity is maintained over the life cycle of the field.

This is the first in the four part PF&C Spring Series.

Web Events

New Web Event on Gas Management Technologies

Join a live web event on 25 February presented by the PFC Study Group on “An In Depth Comparison of Four Gas Measurement Technologies; Orifice, Turbine, Ultrasonic and Coriolis.” The aim of this presentation is to address meter selection and provide pointers to assist engineers within the four major categories (Gas Production, Gas Transmission, Gas Storage and Gas Distribution).

This is the final event in the four part PF&C Spring Series.

Web Events

New Web Event on Crude and Refined Product Metering

Join a live web event on 11 February presented by the PFC Study Group on “Crude and Refined Product Metering – Meter Selection for Loading/Unloading Applications and Meter Proving.” This webinar will discuss the basic operating principles of four metering technologies, as well as the application range of each one of these technologies in terms of viscosity and flow rate.

This is the second in the four part PF&C Spring Series.

Training Course

Training Course: Flow Assurance—Managing Flow Dynamics & Production Chemistry

The course will introduce technologies, workflows and their deployment for the identification, characterization, and management of flow impediments, such as slugging and precipitation of organic and inorganic solids. Topics include:

  • Key flow impediments with examples from various challenging environments
  • Capturing fluid samples and characterizing their PVT properties
  • Production-chemistry impediments—asphaltenes, paraffin waxes, hydrates and inorganic scales
  • Fluid flow and heat transfer concepts in relation to organic and inorganic solids precipitation

Join Abul Jamaluddin 26 January 2015 in Abu Dhabi, UAE. Learn more »

Flow Assurance Technical Section

Register Today for January Flow Assurance Technical Section Luncheon

SPE Flow Assurance Technical Section Presents:

Correlating Flow Regimes and Fluid Properties with Corrosion in Pipelines
Presenter:  Dr. Probjot Singh, ConocoPhillips

When: Thursday, 22 January from 1100 to 1300 hours CDT
Where: Norris Conference Center, CityCentre, 816 Town & Country Blvd., Suite 210, Houston, TX
Registration Fee: SPE Member, USD 40; Nonmember, USD 50

Presentation Topic:
The presentation will discuss corrosion mechanisms that have emerged in production systems due to changes in flow regimes and thermal behavior as conditions changed during field operations. We will see how corrosion monitoring data with fluid analyses, flow modeling, and additional laboratory testing have been effectively used to understand the corrosion mechanism and develop solutions for control.

Program Agenda

1100–1130: Registration and Networking
1130–1300: Lunch
1200–1300: Presentation and Q&A

Register today »

Web Events

New Web Event on Safety Culture

Attend a web event on “Safety Culture Before and After Bhopal” presented by Howard Duhon on 11 March. This webinar will tackle some challenging questions such as – ‘How is safety culture different today?’, ‘What impact did Bhopal have?’, and ‘Did it have more impact on design or on operations?’

note

Director’s Note: Lessons Learned from Bhopal

DIRECTOR’S NOTE:  In the early morning hours of 3 December 1984, a large amount of toxic methyl isocyanate (MIC) gas was released from a Union Carbide India Limited (UCIL) pesticide plant, which swept over a large, densely populated area south of the plant.  Thousands of people were killed including some at the railway station 2 km away. 

I was an employee of Union Carbide Corp. (UCC), the US parent company of UCIL at the time of the accident.  There is a great deal that we will never know about the accident.  It is difficult to investigate a catastrophe of this magnitude.  Most investigations focused on the technical story.  We know that, although significant safeguards were designed into the plant to prevent an MIC release, or at least to minimize its impact, all of the safeguards were bypassed, out-of-service, or otherwise rendered ineffective. 

But there is a social story that is just as important.  Four social drivers form the backdrop to the tragedy:  (1) the appeal of socialism in India, (2) an extreme anti-expatriate legal system, (3) general national poverty with abject localized poverty near the plant, and (4) the lack of a safety culture.  All of these made it difficult to operate a plant of this sort in India at that time.

Financial factors were important as well; the plant was not making money.  UCIL had decided to permanently shut it down, thereby significantly affecting operator morale and exacerbating maintenance deficiencies.  The plant was in its last production run at the time of the accident, working off the last batch of MIC.

Much has changed in the process industries as a result of Bhopal including many things that we take for granted, such as hazard and operability analysis, management of change, permit to work, and dispersion modeling.  There is an important lesson that we have not learned – effective use of SOPs.  The oil and gas industry needs to catch up with the airline and space exploration industries to instill an effective safety culture and to make following SOPs an absolute priority. 

I am frequently struck by how little people know about this accident.   I think it is important to not only remember those killed and injured in the accident but also to resolve that nothing like it will ever happen again. 

Web Events

New Web Event on Crude Oil Separators and Systems

Join the 14 January web event on “Upgrading Crude Oil Separators and Systems for Mature Oil Fields” presented by Graeme Smith. This web event will consider original end of field life design constraints on crude oil separators and in a logical progression illustrates how hidden capacity in a separator can be identified and used to upgrade the separator, both by maximizing the use of available volume in the separator and also by the use of upgraded process internals.

Web Events

New Web Event on Global Decommissioning

Join Jim Christie on 3 February as he discusses global decommissioning. How do you go about decommissioning three interconnected offshore platforms in the UK North Sea, comprising almost 100,000 tonnes of topsides and 40,000 tonnes of jackets, together with abandoning over 100 wells and hundreds of kilometers of pipelines? Carefully, and unless you want to break the bank; differently! There are three important “C’s” to consider: Compliance, Collaboration, and Contracting. Read more »