Category Archives: Production and Operations

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Production Engineers: Collaborate online with SPE Connect—Launching 4 February 2013

A virtual place where you can meet, collaborate, and discuss specific technical challenges and resolutions, SPE Connect is now your link to SPE members in the reservoir discipline worldwide.

SPE Connect’s online communities enable you to share your experience and knowledge, or draw from the combined talent and expertise of SPE’s membership base.

In an instant, exchange technical information with other SPE members in the topics of your choice at a time that is convenient for you. Simply go online to connect with SPE members who share your professional interests and create your own personal technical network. Other disciplines will be launching soon.

To learn more about SPE Connect, click here.

To access the new Production Technical Community, click here.

 

SPE Awards

Nominate a Colleague for a 2013 SPE Production and Operations Award

SPE has a distinguished tradition of recognizing individuals who make significant technical and professional contributions to the worldwide E&P industry. We rely on your nominations to help us celebrate those who have made these contributions.

As an SPE member active in the technical discipline of Production and Operations, you know colleagues who have helped the industry. Nominate them for one of the following awards.

  • International Production and Operations Award
  • Regional Production and Operations Award
  • International Completions Optimization and Technology Award
  • Regional Completions Optimization and Technology Award

Nomination deadline—15 February 2013

 

Welcome to New Technical Director: Productions and Operations

Shauna Noonan

I am excited and honored to be serving as SPE’s Technical Director for Production and Operations (P&O). My entire 20-year career has covered all aspects of P&O, ranging from supervising fracturing treatments in Northern Canada to completing failure analysis investigations on electric submersible pumping systems in South America. Call me biased, but I cannot imagine a better discipline to specialize in than P&O because it covers a wide range of exciting topics such as production logging, well interventions, artificial lift, wellbore multiphase flow behavior and stimulation.

In order to get some better clarity on what topics are actually covered within the P&O Discipline and our ability to address technical issues more effectively, we are implementing a new structure that introduces four new sub-disciplines: 1) Enhanced Productivity; 2) Enhanced Operation; 3) Asset Surveillance and Optimization; and 4) Production Chemistry and Metallurgy. Currently, my Advisory Committee is working on defining the topics that will reside under each of the new sub-disciplines and this will be published on the P&O discipline page in January 2013.  The goal is to disseminate this information across SPE, ranging from publications to conferences, to ensure global conformity. The P&O Technical Section is also going through some significant changes, so stay tuned for announcements regarding these in early 2013 as well.

Shauna Noonan
Wells Supervisor, Completions and Production Technology Group
ConocoPhillips, Houston

 

Hazim H. Abass

Meet the 2012 SPE Completions Optimization and Technology Award

Hazim H. Abass

Hazim H. Abass, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

For his pioneering work on coning-based completion, oriented  perforation, non-planar hydraulic fracturing in horizontal wells, acid vs. proppant fracturing in carbonate formation, sanding tendency, and directed fracturing, Hazim Abass has earned regional & international SPE awards, company awards,10 patents, more than 45 papers, contribution to 3 industrial books, and more than 500 citations.

 

SPE Awards

Congratulations to the 2012 International Award Winners: Production and Operations

Please join SPE in congratulating the 2012 SPE International Award recipients. The SPE Board of Directors approved the 2012 International Award recipients at their recent meeting. Seventeen international award committees recommended these winners to the board because of their outstanding and significant technical, professional, and service contributions to SPE and the petroleum industry. The winners were chosen from a pool of first rate candidates. SPE President Ganesh Thakur will present the awards to the winners at ATCE in San Antonio Texas.

Production and Operations Award
John C. Patterson, ConocoPhillips, Houston, Texas, USA

Completions Optimization and Technology Award
Hazim H. Abass, Saudi Aramco, Dhahran, Saudi Arabia

View a full list of 2012 International Award Winners »

Learn more about SPE International and Regional Awards »

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Don’t miss the PD2A Technical Section Reception at ATCE

When: 8 October 2012 | 1930 – 2200
Where: Iron Cactus Grill, San Antonio, Texas, USA

You are invited to join us for a reception to launch the NEW SPE Technical Section, Petroleum Data-Driven Analytics (PD2A), whose aim is to foster the application of data-driven modeling, data mining and predictive analytics in the upstream oil and gas industry.

This is the place to learn about this forward-thinking, exciting group and network with key decision makers in the E&P industry. Space is limited, so if you are not already a member, join the Technical Section and email your RSVP to reception@spe.org today!

Please submit your name and number of guests attending to be added to the guest list. (Note: Limit of two guests per Technical Section member.)

RSVP by 1 October.

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CO2 Applications

Last year in this focus on CO2 applications, I (as others have) connected enhanced
oil recovery (EOR) as an enabling business foundation and a possible way forward
to accomplish carbon capture and storage (CCS) as a business investment. This year,
in an address to the CCS conference in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US Department of
Energy (DOE) Assistant Secretary of Fossil Energy Charles McConnell encouraged the
CCS industry to help operators establish a salient business case between CO2 EOR and
usage and sequestration. Creating a technical lead in CO2 EOR and other usage technologies
establishes an opportunity to commercialize the technologies that could be
in high demand in the years to come, particularly in coal-reliant developing countries
such as China and India.

The technologies needed to accomplish carbon capture, utilization, and storage
(CCUS) require expertise in science and engineering that, in some cases, are not completely
matured or, at least, require a different focus and commitment in science and
business to affect CCUS. An acceptable return on investment will depend on economic
CO2 capture and largely on regulatory stability.

Administratively, the US Environmental Protection Agency proposed a carbon
pollutions standard for new power plants, which will have to meet 1,000 lbm
of CO2 per electrical megawatt-hour produced. Older coal plants average approximately
1,768 lbm of CO2 per megawatt-hour but are exempt from the standard, as are
plants permitted to begin construction within a year. A typical natural-gas electricitygeneration
plant emits 800 to 860 lbm of CO2 per megawatt-hour.

Legislatively, the proposed US Senate Clean Energy Standard Act of 2012 would
implement a credit system to reduce CO2 emissions. A study by the DOE and the Energy
Information Agency (EIA) to evaluate the effects of this policy concluded that virtually
no electrical generation will occur in 2035 from US coal plants that use CCUS
technology even though CCUS is awarded nearly a full credit under the proposed policy.
The policy predicts a significant shift in the long-term electricity-generation mix
in the US by 2035, with coal-fired generation falling to 54% below the reference-case
level. Combined heat and power generators fired by natural gas increase substantially
through 2020, and nuclear and nonhydropower renewable generation plays a larger
role between 2020 and 2035. The proposed policy could reduce US electric-power-sector
CO2 emissions to 44% below the EIA’s reference case in 2035. National average
delivered electricity prices could increase gradually to 18% above the reference case
by 2035. However, there will still be a need to use the CO2 from the gas-powered plants
in the US and coal-powered plants worldwide by CCUS or other methods. These conclusions
concur with recent reports published by some major oil and gas entities on
the future of natural gas for electrical generation in the US.

The need for pure CCS in developed countries such as the US may not be as great
as in developing countries; but, the US and other developed countries have the ability
and capability to implement CCS through CCUS.

Read the paper synopses in the July 2012 issue of JPT.

John D. Rogers, SPE, is vice president of operations for Fusion Reservoir Engineering Services. With 30  years of experience, he previously worked as a production/operations engineer for Amoco, as a research scientist for the Petroleum Recovery Research Center of New Mexico Tech, and for the National Energy Technology Laboratory of the DOE. Rogers holds BS and PhD degrees in chemical engineering from New  Mexico State University and an MS degree in petroleum engineering from Texas Tech University. Rogers has  contributed to more than 30 publications and has served on several SPE editorial and conference committees. He  currently serves on the JPT Editorial Committee.

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Artificial Lift

Calling all technology champions! A few years ago, I ran across the seven steps to stagnation,
which was a list originally compiled by Erwin M. Soukup. I got a feeling of déjà
vu reading through this list because I had heard these same words spoken from many
managers and peers over my career. If you search for these seven steps on the Internet,
you will find different variations; however, the message is the same. The seven
steps are

  •  We have never done it that way.
  •  We are not ready for that yet.
  •  We are doing all right without it.
  •  We tried it once, and it did not work out.
  •  It costs too much.
  •  That is not our responsibility.
  •  It will not work.

Great ideas for technology improvement or development can have an early demise
when faced with feedback similar to what is on this list. Even with a patent, a product
may never be commercialized without someone to be its champion. While we are fortunate
to have many technology champions in the area of artificial lift, we need more.

The best way to meet and learn from our industry’s best artificial-lift champions
is by attending some of the artificial-lift forums, workshops, and conferences coming
up in 2012 and 2013. Please check out the global events calendar on www.spe.org.
One major SPE artificial-lift event you will not see on the global calendar, however, is
the 2013 Electric Submersible Pump (ESP) Workshop. This is still a section-sponsored
event; however, it has grown to be the primary conference for the ESP industry (the
most-recent event had 560 attendees from 24 countries). Please go to this address for
more information: http://www.spegcs.org/committee/esp-workshop/.

The first paper highlighted features the use of a downhole linear motor to drive a
reciprocating-pump system. This is a new technology that is also featured in two papers
to be presented at the 2012 Annual Technical Conference and Exhibition in San Antonio,
Texas, this October. The two other highlighted papers focus on offshore artificial-lift
systems and discuss the unique challenges and concepts being applied.

Read the paper synopses in the July 2012 issue of JPT.

Shauna Noonan, SPE, is a staff production engineer for ConocoPhillips, where she works as an artificial-lift specialist in the Completions and Production Technology group. Noonan’s responsibilities include  development and validation of artificial-lift and completion systems for thermal applications and improving  artificial-lift reliability. She has worked on artificial-lift projects worldwide at ConocoPhillips and previously  at Chevron for more than 18 years. Noonan has been chairwoman of industry forums and committees and has  authored or coauthored numerous papers on artificial lift. She serves as a member of the SPE Production and Operations Advisory Committee, as an Associate Editor for the SPE Production & Operations journal, and as a member of  the JPT Editorial Committee. Noonan began her career with Chevron Canada Resources and holds a BS degree in petroleum engineering from the University of Alberta.