Category Archives: R&D

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Webinar: Oilfield Mineral Scale Prediction and Control at Extreme Conditions, T, P, Composition

The optimization of production from unconventional reservoirs is a multi-component process that requires proper characterization and understanding of the reservoir properties that control flow capacity and deliverability, coupled with economic considerations for the development. Improving the performance from these complex reservoirs requires collaboration between the geoscience discipline, the reservoir, and completion engineers.

Please join us on 25 August at 0830 Central Time to hear more on this topic.

Find out more and Register.

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Webinar: Decision Quality in Multi-Company Projects

Attend a webinar presenting SPE’s 2016 Technical Report, “Guidance for Decision Quality for Multi-Company Upstream Projects.” This webinar will be presented by Pat Burdett, lead author and will feature 2017 SPE President Janeen Judah as a guest speaker.

View details and register for this event today.

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Webinar: Beyond Bias and Stereotypes: Embracing Multiculturalism from Within

Shifting our own perspectives about other cultures is a result of an internal reflection and approach to work and life that proves to be pivotal in order to enable progressive career paths and business expansions in the oil industry worldwide.

Please join us on 14 June from 0830-1000 Central Time to hear more on this topic.

Register Today.

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Nominate a Colleague for the Distinguished Lecturer Program

Have you seen an exciting lecture on a topic relevant to the E&P industry? Help us identify the best lecturers for the 2017–2018 season by nominating a colleague today. Submit your nomination by 15 March.

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SPE Awards – Nominations Open Now

Now until 15 February, the Society of Petroleum Engineers is accepting nominations for outstanding work in the E&P industry. Take this opportunity to help your dedicated colleagues get the recognition they deserve. Visit the Awards page for more information.

Web Events

Web Event: How to Present Your Paper

In an effort to assist authors in their paper presentations at conferences, SPE is offering the Web Event “How to Present Your Paper” with member and host Byron Haynes,  Jr., P.E. Byron will take the author from preparation to delivery within the presentation process and will field questions from participants following the Web Event.

Speaker Source

SPE Speaker Source

Are you willing to share your knowledge with an audience of SPE members? If you are, we invite you to join Speaker Source, an online directly of E&P professionals who share expertise and experience with SPE Sections and Student Chapters.

Learn more and create your profile today.

Higher Resolution Subsurface Imaging

[Download the Higher Resolution Subsurface Imaging white paper.]

It is hard to read road signs if you have poor eyesight, which is why driver’s licenses are issued with restrictions requiring that corrective lenses must be worn. Likewise, it is hard to find and exploit subsurface resources if you can’t clearly see your targets or monitor the movement of fluids in the reservoir.

Engineers now have powerful tools to precisely model subsurface reservoir production behavior, but a precise answer is still wrong if it is derived from an inaccurate subsurface description. Geoscientists make maps and rock property models of the subsurface by interpreting images that are produced from remote sensing data. Analogs from modern depositional environments and outcrop exposures guide subsurface data interpretation to predict ahead of the bit, then postdrill geostatistics are used to fill in stratigraphic details between wellbore control points. Selection of the right depositional model, facies distribution, and geostatistical analog depends on having the sharpest, most detailed and accurate image of the subsurface possible—the Grand Challenge of Higher Resolution Subsurface Imaging.

Over the past century, the industry has relentlessly sought ways to improve subsurface imaging of hydrocarbons. Canadian inventor Reginald Fessenden first patented the use of the seismic method to infer geology in 1917. A decade later, Schlumberger lowered an electric tool down a borehole in France to record the first well log. Today, advances in seismic and gravity data acquisition, electromagnetics, signal processing and modeling powered by high-performance computing, and the nanotechnology revolution are at the forefront of improved
reservoir imaging.

In this paper, we will examine the challenges of getting higher resolution subsurface images of hydrocarbons and touch on emerging research trends and technologies aimed at delivering a more accurate reservoir picture.

Challenges in Reusing Produced Water

[Read the Challenges in Reusing Produced Water white paper.]

Produced water is an inextricable part of the hydrocarbon recovery processes, yet it is by far the largest volume waste stream associated with hydrocarbon recovery. Water production estimates are in the order of 250 million B/D in 2007, for a water-to-oil ratio around 3:1, and are expected to increase to more than 300 million B/D between 2010 and 2012. Increasingly, stringent environmental regulations require extensive treatment of produced water from oil and gas productions before discharge; hence the treatment and disposal of such volumes costs the industry annually more than USD 40 billion. Consequently, for oil and gas production wells located in water-scarce regions, limited freshwater resources in conjunction with the high treatment cost for produced water discharge makes beneficial reuse of produced water an attractive opportunity.

In-Situ Molecular Manipulation

[Read the In-Situ Molecular Manipulation white paper.]

Energy sources are vital to sustain and grow the world economy. As of today, the world mainly relies on fossil fuel as the source of energy for transportation, power generation, chemicals manufacturing, and other industrial applications. The conventional sources of hydrocarbon are steadily declining; however, the oil and gas industry has been successful in finding unconventional hydrocarbons, such as heavy oil and shale gas. There are distinct challenges in producing and processing the hydrocarbons from unconventional sources into usable end products. Reducing the footprint during the production of oil, refined products, and gas will benefit the industry by reducing the overall cost and improving the health, safety, and environmental impact.

Another source of energy is renewable sources, such as sun, wind, geothermal, biomass, plant seeds, and algae. Producing usable energy from these sources and making it available to the end user pose unique challenges and opportunities. Research to understand the molecular building blocks of organisms living in diverse sources could help optimize the production of usable energy from both fossil and renewable sources. The search for microorganisms should include diverse sources, ranging from hydrocarbon reservoir to the guts of insects such as termites. Research into the molecular structure of these organisms could pave the way for improving exploration, production, and processing of fossil fuels and also help to produce usable energy from renewable sources efficiently and cost-effectively.