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Azimuth Propulsion is Key to the Arctic

Photo courtesy of ABB Marine.
Workers inspect the azimuth thrusters post-installation an icebreaking supply vessel ordered to support development operations offshore Russia’s Sakhalin Island.

One of the key enabling technologies involved with modern Arctic-going vessels is the azimuth thruster. Azimuth thrusters are favored by the cruise industry because they can be tilted at different angles, which reduces propeller-induced vibrations and shock loads on a ship’s hull, allowing passengers to enjoy a quieter voyage. But in the Arctic, azimuth thrusters have been proven to be effective at moving large vessels through ice with greater ease and efficiency than shaft-driven propellers. Because the propeller blades are in front of the pod, where the electric-driven motor is located, they resemble the propellers on the nose of an aircraft and perform much in the same manner by pushing, or pulling, the vessel through the water.

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Azimuth Propulsion is Key to the Arctic

Trent Jacobs, JPT Senior Technology Writer

01 May 2014

Volume: 66 | Issue: 5

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