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Carbon Dioxide: From Industry to Oil Fields

The lifespan of a huge, old oil field in Oklahoma is now linked to a fertilizer plant 68 miles away. Chaparral Energy is capturing 45 million ft3/D of carbon dioxide (CO2) that had previously been vented into the atmosphere in Coffeyville, Kansas, compressing it, and sending it via a pipeline to the Burbank field in Osage County, Oklahoma.

If the USD-250-million project works as planned, Chaparral will revive a field that looked to be near the end, with wells producing more than 99% water, adding a projected 80 million bbl more of oil production.

This is the biggest project for the company that is filling a hole in the CO2 supply map in the middle of the United States by building a CO2 supply system based only on industrial sources for enhanced oil recovery (EOR). Chaparral’s 380-mile long system connects three fertilizer plants and an ethanol plant with fields where it has EOR projects.

The goal is a longer life for marginal oil fields, said Keith Tracy, director of CO2 Midstream at Chaparral. “We have dozens of additional fields on the drawing board.”

Those plans depend on finding more CO2. For Chaparral, and for the industry as a whole, industrial sources appear to be the most promising growth option. A nearly sevenfold expected rise in CO2 captured from industrial waste streams is expected to account for more than half of the 86% increase in US CO2 supplies over the next 5 years, according to a study by Phil DiPietro, strategic planner at the National Energy Laboratory of the US Department of Energy (DOE), and Glen Murrell, a research scientist at the Enhanced Oil Recovery Institute of the University of Wyoming.

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Carbon Dioxide: From Industry to Oil Fields

Stephen Rassenfoss, JPT Emerging Technology Senior Editor

01 February 2014

Volume: 66 | Issue: 2

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