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Produced-Water-Reinjection Design and Uncertainties Assessment

Produced-water reinjection (PWRI) is an important strategy for deriving value from waste water, but its implementation can face challenges related to injectivity and safety issues. The first objective of a PWRI-design study is to supply water-quality specifications, and the second is to supply injection-pressure specifications. The objective of this paper is to detail how water quality and injection pressure are deduced when uncertainties of input data are considered.

Introduction

Before any PWRI design commences, a feasibility study is performed to assess any compatibility issues and evaluate the risk of scaling and souring and the viability of the project. Bacteria growth and corrosion of the installations have to be tackled and mitigated upstream in the early phase of the project.

The first objective of a PWRI-design study is to determine the water quality in terms of optimum total-suspended-solid (TSS) and oil-in-water (OIW) contents, which could remain in the water after treatment and which would enable maintaining the injectivity under PWRI during the field life. These two parameters allow design of the water-treatment installations. The second objective is to determine the pressure needed to achieve PWRI sustainability; the pump power and the injection-network size will be designed on the basis of this pressure.

This article, written by JPT Technology Editor Chris Carpenter, contains highlights of paper SPE 165138, “Produced-Water-Reinjection Design and Uncertainty Assessment,” by Jalel Ochi, Dominique Dexheimer, and Vincent Corpel, Total EP France, prepared for the 2013 SPE European Formation Damage Conference and Exhibition, Noordwijk, the Netherlands, 5–7 June. The paper has not been peer reviewed.
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Produced-Water-Reinjection Design and Uncertainties Assessment

01 December 2013

Volume: 65 | Issue: 12

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