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All-Electric Subsea Well Brings Benefits vs. Traditional Hydraulic Technology

Topics: Subsea systems
Fig. 1—The two-off electric trees undergoing tests in 2008.

Currently, the state of the art for subsea well control is based on hydraulic technology. Hydraulic fluid is supplied from a host facility to the subsea wells through dedicated tubes within an umbilical and is distributed to the wells. Shifting that trend, K5F3, the world’s first all-electric well in the subsea industry, opened to production on 4 August 2016. This paper presents the benefits of electric subsea control compared with current state-of-the-art hydraulic methods.

Rationale for Electric Production System

Expenditure Savings. When looking at the introduction of a new technology such as an electric system, successful introduction is a direct consequence of a perceived reduction in capital expenditure (CAPEX) and factors such as operating expenditure (OPEX); health, safety, and environment (HSE); and future readiness also need to be addressed.

To perform preliminary system engineering for the implementation of the electric system and provide a comparison with a conventional electrohydraulic multiplex system, a case with five oil-­production wells, one gas-injection well, and three water-injection wells was used as a base case for cost. The study concludes that the electric system is likely to show a range of benefits over the equivalent electrohydraulic multiplex system.

 

This article, written by Special Publications Editor Adam Wilson, contains highlights of paper OTC 27701, “World-First All-Electric Subsea Well,” by Thomas Schwerdtfeger, Total E&P Netherlands; Bruce Scott, Halliburton; and Jan van den Akker, SPE, OneSubsea, a Schlumberger Company, prepared for the 2017 Offshore Technology Conference, Houston, 1–4 May. The paper has not been peer reviewed. Copyright 2017 Offshore Technology Conference. Reproduced by permission.
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All-Electric Subsea Well Brings Benefits vs. Traditional Hydraulic Technology

01 April 2018

Volume: 70 | Issue: 4

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