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US Onshore Pressure Pumpers Adjusting to New Market Demands

Source: Halliburton.
A Halliburton frac spread in the Permian Basin. The industry’s No. 1 pressure pumper in terms of deployed horsepower has dramatically expanded its fleet over the past year.

Like other segments of the oilfield services industry, the US onshore pressure pumping space looks very different compared with a couple of years ago.

Decreased demand during the downturn forced some pumpers out of business and spurred consolidation, resulting in high personnel turnover in the field. Meanwhile, exploration and production (E&P) companies are drilling longer laterals faster and expecting similar efficiencies from pressure pumpers. Hoping to get the absolute most out of their wells, operators are intensifying completions by using more stages, water, and frac sand.

Now, with oil prices higher, E&Ps more focused on cash flow, and a growing count of wells awaiting completion, demand for pressure pumping is increasing fast, creating a race for horsepower among a leaner group of opportunistic firms hoping to gain market share. This includes the rise of large integrated, pure-play, and regional pressure pumpers and less use of integrated well services that include a full suite of completions work.

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US Onshore Pressure Pumpers Adjusting to New Market Demands

Matt Zborowski, Technology Writer

01 May 2018

Volume: 70 | Issue: 5

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