ADVERTISEMENT

What’s Different About These Drill Bits? How a Little Change Can Be Made to Matter

Source: DSATS/Fred Florence.
The drill bit on top was designed by a team from Norwegian University of Science and Technology for the 2018 Drillbotics competition. Below is the one used by all the other teams.

There is not a big difference between those two drill bits. Both have fixed cutters and show some wear.

If they look small, that is perceptive. They were used on the automated drilling rigs, which are the scale of machine tools, built by student teams for the Drillbotics competition.

The one on the top was designed by the team from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), which was the first to design its own fixed-­cutter bit in the competition put on by SPE’s Drilling Systems Automation Technical Section (DSATS).

The difference is in the polycrystalline diamond cutters (PDC), and it is not a big one. The ones on the student-designed bit (top) have a lower profile than the one (bottom) provided to all the competitors for free by Baker Hughes, a GE company.

Varying the cutter size and angle to change how much rock a bit breaks off per rotation are common design options. When John Macpherson, a senior technical advisor for Baker Hughes and a former DSATS chair, saw it, he said: “It looks like a normal PDC bit.”

What made that small ­difference worth noting are the things the NTNU team did to turn it into a significant advantage.

...
This article is reserved for SPE members and JPT subscribers.
If you would like to continue reading,
please Sign In, JOIN SPE or Subscribe to JPT

What’s Different About These Drill Bits? How a Little Change Can Be Made to Matter

Stephen Rassenfoss, JPT Emerging Technology Senior Editor

01 January 2019

Volume: 71 | Issue: 1

ADVERTISEMENT


STAY CONNECTED

Don't miss out on the latest technology delivered to your email weekly.  Sign up for the JPT newsletter.  If you are not logged in, you will receive a confirmation email that you will need to click on to confirm you want to receive the newsletter.

 

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT

ADVERTISEMENT