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Mature Fractured Reservoirs Can Be Repurposed for Gas Storage

This paper discusses studies conducted on two California offshore fields that may be abandoned in the near future. These studies examined the feasibility of repurposing these fields for offshore gas storage by using their reservoir voidage and existing pipeline facilities. These storage sites could offer a significant alternative to the current onshore sites located in highly populated urban areas of the state.

Introduction

California has been a major oil-producing state since the turn of the 20th century. However, in terms of current natural gas production, California’s indigenous production meets only approximately 10% of state demand.  

Gas imports are delivered on interstate pipelines from sources in the southwestern and Rocky Mountain regions of the US and western Canada. The majority of gas delivered to California is consumed directly or pumped into onshore storage fields. California currently has 14 onshore gas-storage fields used to stabilize the supply system. The total current onshore storage capacity is approximately 600 Bcf, with the working capacity being approximately 375 Bcf.

This article, written by JPT Technology Editor Chris Carpenter, contains highlights of paper SPE 190134, “Securing California Gas Supplies by Storage in Mature Fractured Monterey Reservoirs Offshore California,” by Iraj Ershaghi, SPE, Donald L. Paul, SPE, and Saran Kaba, SPE, University of Southern California, prepared for the 2018 SPE Western Regional Meeting, Garden Grove, California, USA, 22–27 April. The paper has not been peer reviewed.
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Mature Fractured Reservoirs Can Be Repurposed for Gas Storage

01 April 2019

Volume: 71 | Issue: 4

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