SPE Workshop: Subsea Processing from Reservoir to Topside 5 - 6 Nov 2018 Hotel NH Den Haag The Hague, The Netherlands

Schedule

Monday, November 05

08:00 - 09:00
08:40 - 10:10
Keynote Speech
Moderator(s) Ole Okland, Equinor
Speaker(s) Snorre Grande, Equinor; Jon Arve Svaeren, One Subsea; Eric Meyer, Total; Ole Thomas McClimans, Subsea Processing

0840 - 0850: Welcome by Ole Okland

0850 - 0910: World Class Recovery through Technology Innovation by Snorre Grande; Project Director Åsgard Subsea Compression phase II; Equinor

0910 - 0930: Why are subsea processing technology attractive for development of future offshore fields? by Jon Arve Sværen, Business Strategy Manager; OneSubsea

0930 - 0950: Deep water technology by Eric Meyer; R&D Director deepwater Technology; Total

0950 - 1010: Reducing cost and lead times of SSP projects to enable projects by Ole Thomas McClimans, Director Subsea Processing

10:10 - 11:00
Session One: Today's Industry and the Importance of Capital Expenditure
Session Chairpersons Jeff Jones, Exxon Mobil; Nino Fogliani, Woodside Energy
Speaker(s) Ian Ayling, NOV; Martin Sorensen, OMV; Truls Norman, Aker Solutions

Today's industry is challenged with lower commodity prices. Current conventional production capacity together with new unconventional capacity may mean that this is the new normal. It's a competition and investors are looking for capital efficiency. What is the minimum capital I can commit for the earliest and greatest return?

We need to compete for that capital. In the past, we would consider subsea processing for either greenfield or brownfield projects if the economics were robust. We also considered strategic investment, developing technologies to enable greater returns well into the future. Today's it's not only about being robust, but being the most capital efficient investment.

Prior subsea processing project succeeded with a good value case, enabling or increasing reserves production via a subsea processing solution, with no specific constraint on capital expenditure provided there was line-of-sight to value. Technical risks were front-of-mind and we proceeded when they were low or managed effectively.

Today we need to compete by considering value and capital efficiency. Are our subsea processing solutions more competitive than alternatives (more wells, modified or new surface facilities and even unconventionals)?

Can we deliver low capital projects with fast return on capital employed?

Can we phase our subsea processing solutions involving minimum capital to start and develop in a phased manner from there?

The bar has been raised. The competition has increased.

How will we deliver exceptional value, quickly, for the lowest capital expenditure?

1010 - 1015: Introduction and session overview by Jeff Jones, Exxon Mobil; Nino Fogliani, Woodside Energy

1015 - 1100: Three short duration speakers (15 minutes)

  • New technology for a new paradigm by Ian Ayling, NOV
  • Wisting in Barents sea by Martin Sorensen, OMV
  • Subsea Power Systems - more business cases and reduced investment by Truls Norman, Aker Solutions
11:00 - 11:30
11:30 - 12:30
Session One Continued: Today's Industry and the Importance of Capital Expenditure
Session Chairpersons Jeff Jones, Exxon Mobil; Nino Fogliani, Woodside Energy

Today's industry is challenged with lower commodity prices. Current conventional production capacity together with new unconventional capacity may mean that this is the new normal. It's a competition and investors are looking for capital efficiency. What is the minimum capital I can commit for the earliest and greatest return?

We need to compete for that capital. In the past, we would consider subsea processing for either greenfield or brownfield projects if the economics were robust. We also considered strategic investment, developing technologies to enable greater returns well into the future. Today's it's not only about being robust, but being the most capital efficient investment.

Prior subsea processing project succeeded with a good value case, enabling or increasing reserves production via a subsea processing solution, with no specific constraint on capital expenditure provided there was line-of-sight to value. Technical risks were front-of-mind and we proceeded when they were low or managed effectively.

Today we need to compete by considering value and capital efficiency. Are our subsea processing solutions more competitive than alternatives (more wells, modified or new surface facilities and even unconventionals)?

Can we deliver low capital projects with fast return on capital employed?

Can we phase our subsea processing solutions involving minimum capital to start and develop in a phased manner from there?

The bar has been raised. The competition has increased.

How will we deliver exceptional value, quickly, for the lowest capital expenditure?

1130 - 1150:  Group discussion - 4 things that subsea processing solutions should focus-on to deliver capital efficient solutions 

1150 - 1205: Report back

1205 - 1230: Panel discussion 

12:30 - 13:30
13:30 - 15:00
Session Two: Commercial Viability and Economics of Subsea Processing
Session Chairpersons Per Arne Nilsen, Total; Aslaug Melbø, BakerHughes GE
Speaker(s) Jeff Jones, Exxon; Anthony Protheroe-Winters, Shell; Marcello Augustus, Petrobras; Aslaug Melbo, BHGE; Per-Arne Nilsen, Total

Subsea processing is assumed to deliver value to developments, but the uptake has been relatively limited and continues to be a disappointment for those that have developed products and services in this segment.  Obviously, the last few years industry downturn has not been helpful, but it has probably shown that cost needs more focus, as the value may not be the most dominating decision parameter in all cases.

There are several types of subsea processing (boosting and compression, separation, reservoir pressure support/water injection, storage of chemical and fluids). The technical maturity level may be different for these systems and the threshold for considering them in a development will vary.  But regardless they need to deliver on a few key criteria:

  • The potential value creation must balance the perceived risk
  • The cost must be such that the project/the development is attractive for the investors – i.e. competitive with other energy projects delivering acceptable profits and (more?) competitive cost levels

The session will include presentations from key representatives from the industry looking at what are the key commercial drivers. How can the industry approach and mitigate these to enable more developments utilizing subsea processing technology. What are the perceived show stoppers – and how is value and cost considered by decision makers. What can the industry do to de-risk and cut cost – and deliver more attractive business cases for the decision makers?

To create the most value for the participants the session will facilitate discussions with the presenters and between workshop participants and allow for necessary Q&A

1330 - 1335: Introduction by Per-Arne Milsen, Total

1335 - 1355: Julia GoM pump experience by Jeff Jones, Exxon
1355 - 1415: Ormen Lange Late Life Recovery by Anthony Protheroe-Winters, Shell 
1415 - 1435:  Integrated Strategies in the Implementation of New Projects - A New Chance for Subsea Processing Technologies by Marcello Augustus; Petrobras

1435 - 1500: Panel Discussion

15:00 - 15:30
15:30 - 17:00
Session Three: Network Modelling and Digitalisation
Session Chairpersons Sonja Hauge, Aker Solutions; Fabio Passarelli, Petrobras
Speaker(s) Thomas Lindvig, Onesubsea; Mahnaz Hatvik, TechnipFMC; Samuel Kvernes and Steinar Øyulvstad, AkerBP and Aker Solutions

Today when the cost of data transfer, data storing and processing has become much cheaper and much more accessible there exist a tremendous potential for optimising the way we traditionally have been working. Using network modeling and digitalisation tools together with a close integration between the disciplines: reservoir, production, subsea, surf and topside, optimisations that increase production and reduce cost can be achieved in feasibility-, design- and operational-phases of field developments.

 

This session will explore through case studies how network modeling and digitalisation tools can be used to:

  • Increase production
  • Optimise the design
  • Optimise the operation
  • Reduce the risk
  • Reduce the downtime

 

After the case studies there will be a panel session and group work were the focus will be on understanding the potential of these powerful tools and how these tools can be used as an aid for both suppliers and operators in order to sanction more subsea processing projects.

1530 - 1550: Methods for Subsea Processing field development planning by Thomas Lindvig, Onesubsea
1550 - 1610: Optimized Field Development through Integrating Field Network with Dynamic Reservoir model by Mahnaz Hatvik, TechnipFMC
1610 - 1630: Design and production optimization of offshore area developments by Samuel Kvernes and Steinar Øyulvstad, AkerBP and Aker Solutions

1630 - 1705: Group Work 

17:05 - 17:15

Tuesday, November 06

08:30 - 10:30
Session Four: Subsea Processing Systems
Session Chairpersons Ole Okland, Statoil; Knut Olaf Nyborg, Aker Solutions
Speaker(s) Julie Lund, NOV; Francois-Xavier Pasque, Total; Hans Fredrik Kjellnes, One Subsea; Helge Lunde, NOV SEABOX;

Subsea processing systems is important enablers to develop both new fields and smaller discoveries in mature areas at a lower cost. Simple, robust and proven technologies like gravity separators, injection pumps and multiphase pumps may completely alter the way new reserves are developed in mature areas. If you add subsea cooling, seawater treatment, water polishment, subsea power solutions, subsea storage and chemical distribution and compression new large greenfields may also be developed in a more cost effective way. And in addition, new subsea processing technology will also enable development of smaller new fields as satellites to existing infrastructure.

The industry has shown a great ability to work together with oil companies over the last few years to bring down the breakeven price of fields, but the prospects for subsea processing system seems to not increase and no projects have been sanctioned lately. There are some prospects for gas/liquid separation, boosting and compression but very few prospects for oil/water separation.

Why is this?

  • Is our industry to conservative to utilize the available tools?
  • Do we have adequate tools?
  • Is the risk acceptable, or are there a difference of perception on the risk in the industry?
  • Are we able to establish concept solution utilizing new subsea processing technologies?

In this session, we will explore trends within the market for new subsea processing technology including power systems and present some tangible examples on how subsea processing systems can be used to establish unconventional solution that increase production, reduce cost, have low risk and reduce carbon footprint for both area developments and new greenfields.

New subsea processing technology such as Subsea seawater treatment and injection including technology solutions for pretreatment and sulfate removal of seawater seem to be in the finale qualification phase preparing for deployment in new business cases. Major investment recent years on subsea power conversion and distribution system will also give new opportunities for more efficient subsea processing stations allocated at the seabed. Improved system for pipeline heating, subsea storage and chemical injection system are other technology building blocks giving the oil industry more tools for future subsea concepts.

Subsea chemical storage and injection is an opportunity to reduce initial field development costs, alternative to remote drill center location in Long Distance Tiebacks, allow additional wells to be tied in beyond what was originally planned, or to supplement the umbilical in the event it is damaged, or otherwise no longer suitable for this service.

0830 - 0850: Subsea storage and chemical distribution (Deepstar project) by Julie Lund, NOV Completion & Production Systems
0850 - 0910: Subsea chemical storage – incl. tank qualification by Francois-Xavier Pasque, Total
0910 - 0930: Learning from Subsea seawater injection  and ongoing improvements by Hans Fredrik Kjellnes, OneSubsea
0930 - 0950: SPRINGS – industrialization – by Riccardo Giolo from SAIPEM 
Co-presented by: Graeme Skivington from VEOLIA; Aurelie Berthelot from TOTAL
0950 - 1010: Seabox and SWIT technology for sulfate removal by Helge Lunde, NOV SEABOX

1010 - 1030: Panel discussion by Ole Okland, Equinor and Sonja Hauge, Aker Solutions 

10:30 - 11:00
11:00 - 12:30
Session Five: Subsea Separation: When Does Subsea Separating Win?
Session Chairpersons Ole Okland, Statoil; Torbjørn Ruud, TechnipFMC
Speaker(s) Einar Eng Johnsen, Equinor; Espen Gjørv, Lundin; Martin Sørensen, OMV; Asle Hovda, Seabed Separation; Fabio Passarelli, Petrobras; Carlos A Capela Moraes, Saipem

To build a robust subsea separation business case, operators depend on the suppliers to develop the right solutions and the suppliers are patiently waiting for the next opportunity.

This session will look at the learning from the past where close cooperation between operators and vendors has led to the first subsea separation stations such as Troll pilot, Tordis, Marlim, Perdido and Pazflor.

However, no new business cases for subsea separation has been sanctioned the last decade. In parallel, several new vendors are developing and qualifying alternative subsea separator systems with different functionality compared with conventional gravity-based separation solutions.

Presentations and discussions will seek to answer:

  • Update on New subsea separation technology for produced water treatment and gas/liquid separation & treatment
  • Which are the competing IOR/EOR technologies to Subsea separation? (Can we use this to understand when subsea separation is the most competitive option?)
  • How do we quantify the value of performing separation and re-injection at the seabed? Are we good enough in quantifying the additional production you may achieve by subsea separation?
  • How can the industry work to ensure that more subsea separation projects succeed in being the preferred solution in the concept phase?
  • What can we learn from projects that have succeeded and those that have not been sanctioned?
  • How to handle produced water. Can produced water be disposed to sea and what will be the specifications to allow such disposal?
  • Do we have the right technology for subsea separation or do we need better solutions for produced water handling subsea?

Participants can look forward to a comprehensive update on the status of technology, main installations, ongoing developments, and potential gaps to address in the near future.

1100 - 1118: 10 years since Tordis, what is the challenge with subsea separation by Einar Eng Johnsen, Equinor
1118 - 1136: L/L separation at Rolvsnes/Utsirahøyden by Espen Gjørv,  Lundin
1136 - 1154: How and why subsea oil-water separation can be turned into an attractive business case by Carlos A Capela Moraes, Saipem
1154 - 1212: Seabed separation dual pipe separator - from laboratory to field? by Asle Hovda, Seabed Separation
1212 - 1230: HiSep solution for subsea CO2 separtion by Fabio Passarelli, Petrobras

12:30 - 13:30
13:30 - 14:00
Session Five: Panel Discussion
Session Chairpersons Ole Økland, Equinor; Torbjørn Ruud, TechnipFMC;
14:00 - 15:45
Session Six: Boosting and Compression - The Best Tool for Artificial Lift
Session Chairpersons Aslaug Melbø, Baker Hughes, a GE company; Birger Velle Hanssen, OneSubsea
Speaker(s) Rune Vesterkjær, Aker Solutions; Pierre-Jean Bibet, Total; John Olav Fløysand, OneSubsea; Kristin Neergad Berg, DNV-GL

More than 40 subsea pumping systems have been delivered and put in operation during last 20 years, in addition 2 subsea gas compression systems have recently been started up in the North Sea.  With this experience, subsea boosting has become the most commonly used tool for subsea processing.

In this session we will hear from operators that have experience with subsea boosting in deep water fields and also how business cases are built when selecting these systems.

Participants can look forward to presentation and discussions around these themes:

  • What are the type of subsea field that will benefit most by utilizing subsea boosting?
  • What are the benefits and challenges during operation?
  • Has expectations been met, and has the investment payed back?
  • Why do we not see more applications for subsea boosting?

1400 - 1420: Subsea compression solutions = low carbon footprint by Rune Vesterkjær, Aker Solutions
1420 - 1440: Subsea Pumps – recap on Angola block17 experience by Pierre-Jean Bibet, Total
1440 - 1500: Subsea Boosting and Flowline Heating Synergies for Long Tiebacks by John Olav Fløysand, OneSubsea
1500 - 1520: Subsea pump standardisation - on the way to recommended  practice by Kristin Neergad Berg, DNV-GL
1520 - 1545: Facilitated panel discussion and QA 

15:45 - 16:30
16:30 - 17:00