SPE Forum: Understanding the Reservoir Beyond the Wellbore 21 - 23 Oct 2019 Phoenix, Arizona, USA

Agenda

Monday, October 21

07:00 - 08:00
07:00 - 08:00
08:00 - 08:30
Forum Opening Remarks
Session Chairpersons Omer Gurpinar, Schlumberger
08:30 - 12:00
Session 1: Revealing the Reservoir Between Wells Across the Lifecycle Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Ed Behm, Consultant; Birol Dindoruk, Shell

This session will set the stage for what we can tell today between wells and what we want to be able to do in the future. The group will brainstorm at least two circumstances to initially attempt to determine the state of industry and identify topics for closing gaps in what we can know today. The group will frame our understanding in technical and commercial terms to highlight choices to be made, potential shortcomings, and aspects in regards to perfection and steps to potentially get there. The initial brainstorm will be blended topically into the remaining agenda as an initiation point of discussion.

10:00 - 10:30
12:00 - 13:30
13:30 - 16:30
Session 2: Reservoir Scale Petrophysics and Fluid Dynamics – Bridging the Resolution Gap Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Richard Jackson, Schlumberger; Hilko de Jong, Shell

The information obtained from many oilfield measurements fall at the ends of a spectrum – as they are either obtained by probing or imaging the near-wellbore region at high vertical resolution or they illuminate large reservoir volumes at poor vertical resolution; and may be more sensitive to rock properties than to fluid behavior in the reservoir. This session will review current approaches and future needs for multi-physics workflows for the integration and inversion of multidisciplinary measurements and data. How do we extend measurements from the wellbore to interwell and beyond? What methods and technologies are required to image and characterize the interwell space at high resolution to reveal dynamic behaviors? What is needed to improve reservoir surveillance data and its interpretation to understand spatial and temporal changes? For example, to monitor fluid behaviors, saturation changes and reveal dynamic reservoir behaviors? 

14:45 - 15:15
17:00 - 18:30

Tuesday, October 22

07:00 - 08:00
08:00 - 10:30
Session 3: Deepreading: Where are we, What are the Gaps? Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Cengiz Esmersoy, Schlumberger

An abundance of high-resolution measurements and evaluations are available at well locations, but these data represent reservoir properties only inches to a few feet around the well.   In rare circumstances, single-well deep-reading and surface-borehole measurements are available that can expand the region of detailed characterization to hundreds of feet away from wells. For the vast majority of the reservoir we have been limited to deep-penetrating but low-resolution surface measurements like seismic, EM, and gravity. Consequently, significant challenges remain in characterization of the entire reservoir at the resolution required by engineers for development planning. In this section, we will look at conventional and emerging measurements and integration methods.

10:30 - 11:00
11:00 - 12:00
Session 4: Exploiting Reservoir Generated Signals Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Pete Richter, Silixa

Numerical reservior models need reliable calibration using measured results. this applies to both simulations of fluid flow and geomechanical processes. Capturing rock physical and mechanical properties to accurately evaluate reservior geomechanics remains a significant challange to the exploitation and managment of hydrocarbon reserviors. The complex interaction of reservior flow systems with the present-day stress field compounds the problem of developing effective and efficient systems to characterize, model and predict reservior performance. Questions: How can reservior generated signals or measurements be used to constrain reservior flow and geomechanical properties? What new measurements can add to the knowledge to improve models? Do my measurements validate the existing model for flow and geomechanics? What measurements over time can best refine the models? Do we really go back and evaluate the orginal model and assumptions when new measurements and data become know or available?

12:00 - 13:15
13:15 - 17:00
Session 5: Multi-physics Inversion and Interpretation Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Pete Richter, Silixa, Ed Behm, Consultant

Across the reservoir lifecycle, from discovery through abandonment, various measured quantities are used to invert for rock and fluid properties. Recent innovations in full-waveform and joint multi-physics inversions, using for example seismic-, geomechanics-, and flow-data, have significantly improved subsurface insights. Furthermore, new data collection and modeling abilities in rock physics, such as microCT imaging and digital rocks, have yielded additional knowledge critical for improved reservoir characterization. Integrating these advances in inversion methods and rock physics understanding to reduce subsurface uncertainty is the next step. Machine learning techniques offer interesting new avenues for joint analysis of all available data.

14:30 - 15:00
17:30 - 20:00

Wednesday, October 23

07:00 - 08:00
08:00 - 11:30
Session 6A: Integration of Reservoir Simulation Workflows with Multi-Physics Modelling for Reservoir-Scale Application Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Richard Jackson, Schlumberger; Rami Younis, University of Tulsa; Hilko DeJong, Shell

Numerical simulation models and workflows hold the promise for enabling efficient, reliable, and accurate predictions of performance at the systems-scale. Such models make predictions of performance for given sets of proposed operational controls by requiring that the system obeys certain governing physics such as the local conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Nevertheless, they also require a priori information about underlying physical parameters (over space and time), that are invariably uncertain. The closed-loop reservoir management model aims to integrate various forms of historical data in order to inform the model about the uncertain parameters. This session will tackle the future prospects for this old vision in two-parts.

 

1) Datasets can vary widely. This is often the case in terms of not only their raw size in digital format or their frequency/resolution in time and space, but also in terms of what they are actually informative of. In some instances, there is a clear separation of scales such that for instance, displacement waveforms collected over seconds cannot inform about hydrodynamic properties such as permeability to flow in a causal manner. On the other hand, some data-sets are the results of combined effects of geomechanics and hydrodynamics over varying spatial and temporal scales; e.g. production data. This session pertains to delineating and studying the upcoming challenges in characterizing reservoir rock thermo-hydro-mechanical properties to accurately evaluate reservoir geomechanics.

 

2) Over the last decade, considerable advancements have been made in multi-physics simulation capabilities relevant to hydrocarbon reservoirs.  This includes all the geophysical data types (seismic, electromagnetic, gravity, magnetics), basin modeling, computational stratigraphy and coupled geo-mechanical, geo-chemical and flow simulation. The rate of improvements to our ability to simulate increasingly complex earth models has not however been matched by our ability to predict reservoir performance.  New insights could be gained from the integration and inversion of data and measurements acquired during reservoir characterization and during reservoir surveillance and monitoring.  It is our contention that concerted efforts need to be made in how all of the available data and simulation capabilities are integrated to bring about a step change in predictive capability for production.  Ideas to be explored are the role of full joint data set inversions versus sequential user driven integration of inversion and forward modeling of the available measurements and their incorporation into reservoir simulation workflows. There have been improvements in algorithms, workflows and strategies in how different measurements at single-well and reservoir scale can be used.

09:30 - 10:00
12:00 - 13:15
13:15 - 16:00
Session 6B: Integration of Reservoir Simulation Workflows with Multi-Physics Modelling for Reservoir-Scale Application Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Richard Jackson, Schlumberger; Rami Younis, University of Tulsa; Hilko DeJong, Shell

Numerical simulation models and workflows hold the promise for enabling efficient, reliable, and accurate predictions of performance at the systems-scale. Such models make predictions of performance for given sets of proposed operational controls by requiring that the system obeys certain governing physics such as the local conservation of mass, momentum, and energy. Nevertheless, they also require a priori information about underlying physical parameters (over space and time), that are invariably uncertain. The closed-loop reservoir management model aims to integrate various forms of historical data in order to inform the model about the uncertain parameters. This session will tackle the future prospects for this old vision in two-parts.

 

1) Datasets can vary widely. This is often the case in terms of not only their raw size in digital format or their frequency/resolution in time and space, but also in terms of what they are actually informative of. In some instances, there is a clear separation of scales such that for instance, displacement waveforms collected over seconds cannot inform about hydrodynamic properties such as permeability to flow in a causal manner. On the other hand, some data-sets are the results of combined effects of geomechanics and hydrodynamics over varying spatial and temporal scales; e.g. production data. This session pertains to delineating and studying the upcoming challenges in characterizing reservoir rock thermo-hydro-mechanical properties to accurately evaluate reservoir geomechanics.

 

2) Over the last decade, considerable advancements have been made in multi-physics simulation capabilities relevant to hydrocarbon reservoirs.  This includes all the geophysical data types (seismic, electromagnetic, gravity, magnetics), basin modeling, computational stratigraphy and coupled geo-mechanical, geo-chemical and flow simulation. The rate of improvements to our ability to simulate increasingly complex earth models has not however been matched by our ability to predict reservoir performance.  New insights could be gained from the integration and inversion of data and measurements acquired during reservoir characterization and during reservoir surveillance and monitoring.  It is our contention that concerted efforts need to be made in how all of the available data and simulation capabilities are integrated to bring about a step change in predictive capability for production.  Ideas to be explored are the role of full joint data set inversions versus sequential user driven integration of inversion and forward modeling of the available measurements and their incorporation into reservoir simulation workflows. There have been improvements in algorithms, workflows and strategies in how different measurements at single-well and reservoir scale can be used.

15:00 - 15:30
16:00 - 17:00
Session 7: Putting it all Together and The Way Forward Sachem East
Session Chairpersons Omer Gurpinar, Schlumberger; Birol Dindoruk, Shell; Ed Behm, Consultant

This penultimate session will revisit the goal and objectives introduced in Session 1. We shall review the topics discussed during the forum in an integrated way and build a picture of what it will take to characterize the reservoir between wells. We will also reflect on:

  • How well have we defined the challenges?
  • What is the ideal end state and how far are we from it?
  • How can we improve immediately? 5 years from now? 10 years from now?
  • Cumulative summary of where we are and where we (think) we may be